Samotny mężczyzna

  • Title: Samotny mężczyzna
  • Author: Christopher Isherwood Jan Zieliński
  • ISBN: 9788324720453
  • Page: 336
  • Format: Paperback
  • Samotny m czyzna Jeden dzie z ycia George a Falconera kt ry nie mo e pogodzi si z tym e w a nie straci swoj wielk mi o George wyk adowca uniwersytecki w rednim wieku jest Anglikiem i homoseksualist mieszkaj cym w
    Jeden dzie z ycia George a Falconera, kt ry nie mo e pogodzi si z tym, e w a nie straci swoj wielk mi o George, wyk adowca uniwersytecki w rednim wieku, jest Anglikiem i homoseksualist mieszkaj cym w otoczeniu przyk adnych ameryka skich rodzin Postawiony w obliczu utraty najbli szej osoby rozmy la o przesz o ci, literaturze, polityce i mierci Samotny m czyJeden dzie z ycia George a Falconera, kt ry nie mo e pogodzi si z tym, e w a nie straci swoj wielk mi o George, wyk adowca uniwersytecki w rednim wieku, jest Anglikiem i homoseksualist mieszkaj cym w otoczeniu przyk adnych ameryka skich rodzin Postawiony w obliczu utraty najbli szej osoby rozmy la o przesz o ci, literaturze, polityce i mierci Samotny m czyzna to uniwersalna opowie o godzeniu si z samotno ci , kt r wszyscy odczuwamy, i o wielkim znaczeniu ycia tu i teraz O tym, jak wa ne jest zrozumienie, e ma e sprawy s tak naprawd najistotniejsze Na podstawie ksi ki powsta film pod tym samym tytu em Colin Firth, odtw rca g wnej roli, zdoby za ni nagrod dla najlepszego aktora na Mi dzynarodowym Festiwalu Filmowym w Wenecji.

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      Published :2019-06-05T22:35:43+00:00

    About Christopher Isherwood Jan Zieliński


    1. Christopher Isherwood was a novelist, playwright, screen writer, autobiographer, and diarist He was also homosexual and made this a theme of some of his writing He was born near Manchester in the north of England in 1904, became a U.S citizen in 1946, and died at home in Santa Monica, California in January 1986.Isherwood was the grandson and heir of a country squire, and his boyhood was privileged With a school friend, Wystan Auden, he wrote three plays The Dog Beneath the Skin 1932 , The Ascent of F6 1936 , and On the Frontier 1938 Isherwood tells the story in his first autobiography, Lions and Shadows.In 1925, Isherwood was asked to leave Cambridge University after writing joke answers on his second year exams He briefly attended medical school, and progressed with his first two novels, All the Conspirators 1928 and The Memorial 1932 In 1930, he moved to Berlin where he taught English, dabbled in communism, and enthusiastically explored his homosexuality His experiences there, provided the material for Mr Norris Changes Trains 1935 and Goodbye to Berlin 1938 , still his most famous book.In Berlin in 1932, he also began an important relationship with a young German, Heinz Neddermeyer, with whom he fled the Nazis in 1933 Neddermeyer was refused entry to England on his second visit in 1934, and the pair moved restlessly about Europe until they were finally separated when Neddermeyer was arrested by the Gestapo in May 1937.In 1938, Isherwood sailed with Auden to China to write Journey to a War 1939 , about the Sino Japanese conflict They returned to England and Isherwood went on to Hollywood to look for movie writing work He also became a disciple of the Ramakrishna monk, Swami Prabhavananda, head of the Vedanta Society of Southern California He decided not to take monastic vows, but he remained a Hindu for the rest of his life, serving, praying, and lecturing in the temple every week and writing a biography, Ramakrishna and His Disciples 1965.In 1945, Isherwood published Prater Violet, fictionalizing his first movie writing job in London in 1933 1934 In Hollywood, he spent the start of the 1950s fighting his way free of a destructive five year affair with an attractive and undisciplined American photographer, William Caskey Caskey took the photographs for Isherwood s travel book about South America, The Condor and The Cows 1947 Isherwood s sixth novel, The World in the Evening 1954 , written mostly during this period, was less successful than earlier ones.In 1953, he fell in love with Don Bachardy, an eighteen year old college student born and raised in Los Angeles They were to remain together until Isherwood s death In 1961, Isherwood and completed the final revisions to his new novel Down There on a Visit 1962 Their relationship nearly ended in 1963, and Isherwood moved out of their Santa Monica house This dark period underpins Isherwood s masterpiece A Single Man 1964.Isherwood wrote another novel, A Meeting by the River 1967 , about two brothers, but he gave up writing fiction and turned entirely to autobiography In Kathleen and Frank 1971 , he drew on the letters and diaries of his parents In Christopher and His Kind 1976 , he returned to the 1930s to tell, as a publicly avowed homosexual, the real story of his life in Berlin and his wanderings with Heinz Neddermeyer The book made him a hero of gay liberation and a national celebrity all over again but now in his true, political and personal identity His last book, My Guru and His Disciple 1980 , records with similar honesty his conversion to Hinduism and his devotion to Swami Prabhavanandaherwoodfoundation bi


    975 Comments


    1. “A few times in my life I’ve had moments of absolute clarity. When for a few brief seconds the silence drowns out the noise and I can feel rather than think, and things seem so sharp and the world seems so fresh. It’s as though it had all just come into existence.I can never make these moments last. I cling to them, but like everything, they fade. I have lived my life on these moments. They pull me back to the present, and I realize that everything is exactly the way it was meant to be.” [...]

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    2. Christopher Isherwood has written a book that makes me hate him. Or maybe I hate myself? The main theme of this book is loss; loss of a lover, loss of youth, loss of identity, loss of direction, it's all there in beautifully phrased observations and it tickled that spot in my mind, the spot where I hide all of my fears, until I could no longer ignore the fact that I am and I continue to lose these things myself until one day the devastating and unthinkable will happen and I will lose that which [...]

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    3. Even though there are positive reviews aplenty I still had concerns this would turn out to be an overly melodramatic letdown, but needn't have worried as what we have here is a compressed work of utter brilliance from a vastly undervalued writer who does not waste a single word making the reading experience flawless. There are two thing in particular to highlight that nailed it for me, firstly I do not believe Isherwood set out with the intention of writing a story wholly about about homosexuali [...]

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    4. I aspire. It's listed as being 192 pages long, but I swear it's because the edition I read had fifty words a page with three inch margins an every side.It's so economical it is more or less mind-blowing.If my desire to express whimsy came from Terry Pratchett and P.G. Wodehouse, and my inclination to be daring and irreverent came from David Foster Wallace and Stephen King—If my unruly imagination came from Bill Watterson, and my eye for alienation from Susan Cooper—If my lust for scale came [...]

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    5. This book is a truly beautiful thing; a completely exquisite experience. Page after page it spoke to me, as eloquently and profoundly as any book I've ever read. It was sad and funny and wise and observant without ever becoming sentimental or maudlin.In 186 pages of concentrated, yet langorous, stream-of-consciousness prose Isherwood gets to the heart of what it means to be a middle-aged man, a loner, a fish out of water, an expatriate on several levels -- as a Britisher in a new land, a gay man [...]

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    6. He pictures the evening he might have spent, snugly at home, fixing the food he has bought, then lying down on the couch beside the bookcase and reading himself slowly sleepy. At first glance, this is an absolutely convincing and charming scene of domestic contentment. Only after a few instances does George notice the omission which makes it meaningless. What is left out of the picture is Jim, lying opposite him at the other end of the couch, also reading; the two of them absorbed in their books [...]

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    7. This witty, acerbic, elegant little novel should not be confused with the soggy, self-pitying movie of the same name.

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    8. An astounding piece of work; a day in the life of novel. The day belongs to George Falconer; an English professor in his 50s (English by nationality as well) teaching in southern California. It is set in the early 1960s. George’s lover Jim has recently died suddenly and he is alone again. The novel takes us from waking to breakfast, to travelling to work and so on. This doesn’t have the grandiosity of Joyce; it is much more straightforward and focuses living each day because of life’s brev [...]

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    9. English (A Single Man)/ ItalianoGeorge, a middle-aged professor, has an ordinary life, but now he must relate to loneliness because of the untimely passing of his partner. Glimmers of light thanks to few daily joys can be seen in his gray days: a female friend who invites him to dinner to distract him, but awkwardily ends up kissing him, ignoring his homosexuality and pretending more than what George can offer her. Or a college student who spends the night at George's house, giving him a few hou [...]

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    10. For astronauts that had returned from walking on the moon, I imagine that the worst part of their experience was having to live out the rest of their lives. Every other event would be "after the moon"; all experiences would be measured by that yardstick; old and new relationships would orbit around that event.This then makes me think about retired professional athletes, former world-stage politicians, etc. - do they also live out the remainder of their lives reflecting on the halcyon days of yes [...]

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    11. We never meet Jim in person. This is George after Jim. A middle-aged man caught between daydreams and nightmares, adhering to the conformity of life in the daytime, drowning his sorrows - well knowing that the little devils can swim - in alcohol at night. Taking exercise, working hard, and allowing himself daydreaming a little once again, ´cause there MUST be a life after Jim, except there isn´t. How do you cope when your lover is gone, killed in a car crash, a lover you even can´t admit the [...]

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    12. Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) was an English novelist who pioneered the writing of novels with gay themes in English literature. He was openly gay, lived with and befriended fellow gay men some of them were famous also like W. H. Auden and Truman Capote. At some points in his life, he also became friends and was mentored by E. M. Forster. In turn, when he met Ray Bradbury in a chance encounter in a bookstore, he wrote a glowing review for his The Martian Chronicles that helped launch the lat [...]

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    13. I wouldn’t dare to write anything about someone’s absence and how it bares you, as it is already there, tightly packed into this mesmerizing little book. We never truly experience what absence is till it’s too late, don’t we? That’s why we are never prepared. A Single Man, to me, is a novel about Jim-less George and his pain which feels too real to absorb - palpable and ugly, physical and raw, at times almost disgusting. What’s more important (and what I discovered reading this book [...]

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    14. A Single Man is a day in the life (quaint naturalist device, that) of a middle-aged Englishman and English professor grieving in a numbed, autopilot kinda way after the recent death of his partner. I remember Don Bachardy saying in the film Chris and Don: A Love Story that Isherwood wrote this novel during one of their trial separations; the intensity of George’s sense of loss was therefore underwritten by Isherwood’s own dreadful imagination of life without Don. I loved George’s morning, [...]

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    15. Waking up begins with saying am and now.That which has awoken then lies for a while staring up at the ceiling and down into itself until it has recognised I, and therefrom deduced I am, I am now. Here comes next, and is at least negatively reassuring; because here, this morning, is where it had expected to find itself; what’s called at home. But now isn’t simply now. Now is also a cold reminder; one whole day later than yesterday, one year later than last year.Every now is labelled with its [...]

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    16. This is a gem of a book. The style of writing is quite lyrical in a sense and beautiful itself, let alone having a great story line!I finished it quickly and highly recommend the Audiobook version. Narration is stunning & adds a lot to it in my opinion!

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    17. If you watched the 2009 movie version of this story starring Colin Firth before reading this book, be aware that the movie takes the story in a different direction. Kinda sorta? It's different. For all of its similarities, it's different. I saw the movie first because I requested both from the library and the movie came in before the book, and the movies are only borrowable for a week, and who knew when the book was coming in, so I just sucked it up and did it.These are both good stories. But th [...]

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    18. I am not sure if I am just ignorant of what the humor was like in the 60’s, or if Christopher Isherwood was way ahead of his time, but this book definitely has what I would call a modern sense of humor. It’s that special blend of bittersweet heartbreak, self-deprecation, and sardonic wit. I am very familiar with this type of humor from my favorite movies and television shows, but I am pleasantly surprised to find it here, in this brilliant little book that, on the surface, appears to be abou [...]

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    19. Masks - we all wear them. We've got our work masks and our family masks and our friend masks. Then, try adding to that being a gay man living in the netherworld of not pretending to be straight but also not able to be fully out (the early 1960s). That's a lot of freakin' masks! And it's exhausting. And our hero, George, is tired, tired of the bullshit and hypocrisy. Thankfully, he still has a biting sense of humor and beware if you're on the receiving end of his satirical skewer. But George is a [...]

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    20. "Che tipo di esperienza?". "Be', posti in cui si è stati, gente che si è incontrata. Situazioni che si sono già vissute, di modo che quando si ripresentano riusciamo a fronteggiarle. Tutte quelle scemenze che, con gli anni, dovrebbero renderti saggio". "Lascia che ti dica una cosa, Kenny. Degli altri, non posso dire niente - ma, per ciò che mi riguarda, non c'è niente che mi abbia reso saggio. Certo, mi è capitato questo e quello; e quando mi ricapita, mi dico ci risiamo. Ma non mi pare di [...]

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    21. Ho questa convinzione errata che un libro breve non possa equivalere ad un libro con molte pagine questo particolare libro ha smentito questa convinzione che importanza hanno molte pagine se non emozionano, coinvolgono, fanno pensare? Cose che questo romanzo così intenso, ben scritto e profondo offre. Ho trovato un capolavoro in poco più di 140 pagine, non ho altro da dire

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    22. Probably the greatest and saddest ending to a book I have ever read.

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    23. So right after finishing Isherwood's "A Single Man" last night I did this terrible (or wonderful?) thing of whatching the movie based on the book. I was moved after the book, and it only got intensified after I finished the movie at 2:30 am last night. And I could not sleep until the morning. The terrible part is that I can't tell which of the two was responsible for my insomnia in the end. The wonderful part that I had not been moved in such way in a very long time."A Single Man" follows George [...]

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    24. Masterly writing, capable of taking me in the first pages to the 'place' where George lives. Isherwood's writing is full of the little truths of our everyday lives and his wit and social commentary channelled through George rings true not only for when the time this was written but for now also, after all circumstances change but human interaction remains the same. I ended up highlighting most of the book, so I will not quote. If you want quotes, just read the book.(view spoiler)[George is one h [...]

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    25. Good things come in small well written packages. Christopher Isherwood has puts you the reader inside the skin of the protagonist, George, experiencing a day that is both mundane and extraordinary. The loneliness and isolation of a grieving (for all intents and purposes) widower is certainly a central theme. Because George is a gay man in the 1960s, his grief must be private. Even so, I did not read A Single Man as a gay rights protest piece; it was much more than that. Maybe it is just me, but [...]

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    26. “Lo specchio, più che un volto, riflette l’espressione di una difficoltà. […] Lo sguardo provato è quello di un nuotatore o di un podista stremati; eppure, di fermarsi non se ne parla. L’individuo che stiamo osservando lotterà senza tregua fino al crollo. E non per eroismo. Perché non sa immaginarsi un’alternativa.”Quand’ero verso la metà di questo libro, ho pensato che ad essere onesti lo si poteva riassumere con una frase sola, e non delle più complesse. Una frase minimale [...]

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    27. I’ve been meaning to read A Single Man for quite some time now. I watched the film quite a while ago without realizing that it was based on a novel. I didn’t really remember much from the film before I decided to listen to the audiobook, but I did remember that the film was visually beautiful. I remember the cinematography being aesthetically pleasing and gorgeous, so if anything, I was hoping to get the same sense of beauty out of the audiobook.I must say that A Single Man was very well wri [...]

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    28. Wow. I really wanted to finish this book, not because I loved it, but because I have a thing where I need to finish. I was reading to finish, not with eagerness. This was a deep story, in which I really needed to be focused and prepared to fully appreciate the authors clever imagery of a man conflicted within himself and his life. He was a little neurotic, but not unlikeable. I felt it was a bit strange, but I'm happy to try new things. So in a way I'm glad I read it. Now to get to the point! I [...]

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    29. 21/4/14. I gave this 4 stars? Let me remedy that now, this is a 5 star read all the way, essential reading.2012 reviewHow do you review a novel that literally terrifies you? I'm not sure I can do it justice but I'll give it a whirl. For the several hours it took to read this short novel I went through a gamut of emotions. The novel is a day-in-the-life account of George Falconer, an English Professor in 1960's suburban California. George is grieving the loss of his long term partner and it seems [...]

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    30. “I am a camera with its shutter open, quite passive, recording, not thinking… Some day all this will have to be developed, carefully printed, fixed.”That's the famous mission statement from Christopher Isherwood, who steadfastly refuses to fix it - to tell you what it's all about. It's intriguing. One finds oneself naked with a younger person. Why has the person become naked? What is the person's goal? This seems unusual. It's all a little bit oblique. It's intriguing but frustrating. Does [...]

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