Thimble Summer

  • Title: Thimble Summer
  • Author: Elizabeth Enright
  • ISBN: 9781435119529
  • Page: 159
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Thimble Summer A few hours after nine year old Garnet Linden finds a silver thimble in the dried up riverbed the rains come and end the long drought on the farm The rains bring safety for the crops and the livestoc
    A few hours after nine year old Garnet Linden finds a silver thimble in the dried up riverbed, the rains come and end the long drought on the farm The rains bring safety for the crops and the livestock, and money for Garnet s father Garnet can t help feeling that the thimble is a magic talisman, for the summer proves to be interesting and exciting in so many different waA few hours after nine year old Garnet Linden finds a silver thimble in the dried up riverbed, the rains come and end the long drought on the farm The rains bring safety for the crops and the livestock, and money for Garnet s father Garnet can t help feeling that the thimble is a magic talisman, for the summer proves to be interesting and exciting in so many different ways There is the arrival of Eric, an orphan who becomes a member of the Linden family the building of a new barn and the county fair at which Garnet s carefully tended pig, Timmy, wins a blue ribbon Every day brings adventure of some kind to Garnet and her best friend, Citronella As far as Garnet is concerned, the thimble is responsible for each good thing that happens during this magic summer her thimble summer.

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      Published :2020-03-18T09:15:44+00:00

    About Elizabeth Enright


    1. Elizabeth Enright 1907 1968 was born in Oak Park, Illinois, but spent most of her life in or near New York City Her mother was a magazine illustrator, while her father was a political cartoonist Illustration was Enright s original career choice and she studied art in Greenwich, Connecticut Paris, France and New York City After creating her first book in 1935, she developed a taste, and quickly demonstrated a talent, for writing Throughout her life, she won many awards, including the 1939 John Newbery Medal for Thimble Summer and a 1958 Newbery Honor for Gone Away Lake Among her other beloved children s titles are her books about the Melendy family, including The Saturdays, published in 1941 Enright also wrote short stories for adults, and her work was published in The New Yorker, The Ladies Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, The Yale Review, Harper s, and The Saturday Evening Post She taught creative writing at Barnard College Translated into many languages throughout the world, Elizabeth Enright s stories are for both the young and the young at heartcmillan author elizab


    512 Comments


    1. Ten year old Garnet lives on a farm in the the 1930s. We loved the start of this book, instantly both wanting to live there in Garnet's house and go swimming in water that was too warm! That never happens in England! We enjoyed the characters and the tale of the coral bracelet and the library incident, the story felt like an autobiography. The descriptions of cooking lime in a lime kiln for cement were very interesting and the harvest descriptions were evocative and for all the other differences [...]

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    2. A charming, great-for-summer novel. I love the writing style and the way the simple things are described in such a beautiful way.

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    3. Why didn't I know about Elizabeth Enright when I was growing up? I read everything by Maud Hart Lovelace and Lois Lenski, but she passed me by. Enright's books are just the type that I adored when I was 9 or 10 years old--a bit old-fashioned, but smart, with characters who were adventurous and curious and made messes and hung out with the coolest grownups.

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    4. Elizabeth Enright is one of my favorite authors in all the world. This book exemplifies how she could paint a picture of a child's world with just the right details to make it amazingly clear. Her insight into what makes life interesting to a young mind leads to sentences with startling evocative perfection.Reading this book makes me feel like a young girl growing up on a Wisconsin farm in the 1930's. I adore this book and cannot recommend it strongly enough to absolutely everyone.

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    5. Elizabeth Enright is one of my favorite writers, but her 1939 Newbery Award winner about one summer in the life of Garnet, an active and sunburned (yet bookish) Wisconsin farm girl, is my least favorite of her novels. I picked it up recently for a book discussion in the Children's Book Group, and although I'd read it multiple times, including once before as an adult, I found very little of it had remained with me, except for the vivid cover illustration (Enright's own work) and the episode when [...]

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    6. As most readers know, any book written by Elizabeth Enright (see my book recomendation of Gone-Away Lake; 4-star) is a work of art, but this book is certainly the highlight of her career. Garnet (Enright comes up with the weirdest names) finds a silver thimble by the lake, and she's sure it's magic when the summer proves to be so interesting to her. Her prized runt (this part is thought by some to be a ripp-off of Charlotte's Web) wins a blue ribbon at the fair, and there was the adoption of a b [...]

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    7. I did not care for this book. It was a Newberry winner, apparently, but I dunno. There wasn't really a connecting plot through the whole story. Each chapter was a totally separate story, if you ask me. The only connection was the characters and they all took place in the same summer. But it could have just as easily been a series of short stories, you know?For instance, the second chapter is a story where Garnet (the main character) and her friend are listening to her friend's grandmother tell a [...]

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    8. Just ok. I listened to the audiobook. The narration was very good, but the storyline did not hold my attention very much.

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    9. This is typical of the type of story I most enjoyed when I was in the range of 8 to 11 years old. I know I read this one several times, but I don't know if I owned the book or checked it out of the library.2017: I just read this book again finding the thimble is the only part of the story I remembered. The rest of the story is familiar, but is that because I've read many books that are similar to this one or because I remember this particular story?Garnet, ten years old, lives on a farm in rura [...]

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    10. This won the Newbery in 1939. After I read The Cat Who Went To Heaven (1931 Newbery winner) I was a little gun-shy about the 1930s winners. I was starting to think all the early Newberys were duds but this book proved me wrong! It's a quick read and a nice feel-good story. The author has a way of describing things that reminds me of my relatives in Western Pennsylvania--descriptive and colorful but no frills language that gets to the heart of what's going on. I love that kind of story telling. T [...]

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    11. As I slowly muddle my way through the Newbery award winners (starting with the 1920s and working my way to present day), I find that there are a few gems scattered throughout that seem to align with my reading tastes, and this is definitely one of them.I'm generally game for the farm setting, whether it be something bleak like Tess of the D'Urbervilles or something more lighthearted and positive like Thimble Summer. Plus, with a projected high of only 16 degrees today, I think I've needed a litt [...]

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    12. Thimble Summer by Elizabeth Enright is a good book written in the 1930s. The main character finds a silver thimble which is magic. The main character’s name is Garnet, who is a tomboy. She wears overalls and walks around bare-footed. Garnet has a problem. It wouldn’t rain for a long time. Then Garnet went out and found the silver thimble. It rained as soon she got home. The next evening after it rained, in the middle of the night a boy appeared and was adopted by Garnet’s family. The next [...]

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    13. This story of a farm girl's summer adventures, set in 1930s Wisconsin, really captured my heart. Elizabeth Enright clearly remembered what it was like to be a child and evoked that state beautifully. I liked the characters, the seeming simplicity with which the story unfolded, and especially liked the descriptive writing ("The barn was huge and old; it lurched to one side like a bus going around a corner."). Enright won the 1939 Newbery for this one. I look forward to reading other books by this [...]

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    14. What a fun book to read aloud! I love Elizabeth Enright's style. Her descriptions are beautiful and the dialogue is easy to read. Vocabulary words pop up just often enough to encourage discussion and dictionary searches. This was a great book for identifying setting and its effect on the story.

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    15. This was a great little book. It's the story of Garnet, a nine year old, who lives on a farm with her family. They are struggling due to the hot weather and the drought. Then Garnet finds a beautiful silver thimble. That very night, rain falls. And Garnet feels like her thimble is magical.It's just a nice book, full of the adventures of a girl and her family. They befriend and take in an orphan boy named Eric and Garnet raises a pig named Timmy. It's not a particularly deep book but you enjoy Ga [...]

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    16. This book had been in my huge pile of TBR for years and it became one of the books that told me to stop buying new books (or at least buy less), read and discover gem in what you already had (but shamelessly neglected). It is a beautiful book. The one that makes you feel good when you finish it at night and wake up feeling wonderful the next morning.Thimble Summer is an old-fashioned kind of book (well, it's an old book written decades ago). A story of a little girl named Garnet and her family. [...]

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    17. Very pleasant, but not extraordinary. Something like Understood Betsy has a lot more going for it. I very much enjoyed Enright's illustrations, with such bold colors. Incidentally, the original cover Thimble Summer is far superior to the later one Thimble Summer where Timmy the pig is enormous. Just unrealistic to imagine her standing calmly with such a beast.It's interesting to see how Enright's writing developed from Kintu to this to the Melendys to Gone-Away and how she frequently returns to [...]

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    18. I have been reading the Newbery winners in order, and I think this was the first one (starting from 1922) where I felt that it could have been released in this day-n-age and all the lingo would have felt right. It’s not like I’m reading non-English, or that books haven’t been written to portray different eras/countries, but there was an “older” book vibe. Thimble Summer didn’t have a smidgen of that. (It dates itself, just in discussions of money and cars, but that's not what I mean. [...]

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    19. What a wonderful story! I love books that take me back to the good old days when families, neighbors and communities all helped each other. Work is a daily expectation and children take part as a natural part of their lives. Fun is not store-bought and loving the outdoors is where the entertainment is found. I liked the character of Garnet - she's feisty and independent, loves her family (most of the time) and finds magic in a simple silver thimble. Some of this story is based on the remembrance [...]

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    20. Newbery Medal Winner--1939Thimble Summer rounds out the 1930's Newbery winners, and we get another story about a girl rebelling against what is expected of her gender (I love that these books were not only available to girls at the time, but were also seen as quality literature). Like a lot of the early Newbery winners, this one had some fun moments--I'm particularly fond of Garnet's hitchhiking adventure--in what is essentially just a description of things happening over time (in this case, one [...]

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    21. Garnet lives on a farm. One summer she finds a thimble in their swimming hole and she is certain it is lucky. She certainly seems to have some lucky (and a few unlucky) things happen to her throughout the summer. She has a number of adventures such as getting locked in the library and running away from home. Much like The Saturdays, the story is very episodic in nature. Each chapter could nearly stand alone. I loved Mr. Freebodyhe was a kind man who helped watch over and protect Garnet, chastisi [...]

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    22. Another classic by Elizabeth Enright. I love this author even though I am an old grandma! I bought this book for my granddaugher's birthday, but had to re-read it before giving it to her. I love the simplicity of childhood in Mrs. Enright's books. Garnet's many adventures make for good reading. She got locked in a library after closing hours, she ran away from home, she hitchhiked, she got stuck on the top of a ferris wheel! This is good reading about a little girl who lived at a time when kids [...]

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    23. Kate gave me this book from the Kearney Library mostly because the main character's name is Garnet, and Garnet currently happens to be my favorite girl name. I've been reading Thimble Summer on the bus the last week, and it has been wonderful. Enright's descriptions of rural Wisconsin are fantastic. They made me want to go out and pet a pig and take a trip to a county fair. I especially enjoyed Garnet's hitchhiking adventure and the addition of Eric to the Linden family. The drawings were excell [...]

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    24. I re-read this book at least a couple times per year -- there is something so pleasant about the ritual of revisiting Garnet and her family on their farm; first waiting for the rain to come, then her adventures with Priscilla, the strange visitor, and then Garnet's own journey from home, only to return back again. The illustrations are simple pen and ink line drawings, but they convey the story's elements beautifully. This book is most definitely a classic.

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    25. Another one of those books for kids that just makes me feel all mushy inside. Like all of Elizabeth Enright's other books, and Sarah Plain and Tall et al, this takes me back to a time when things were tougher and simpler and little things mattered. And Enright sure knew how to paint a picture with words! Tomorrow I'll tell Miss 8 that I read her book while she was sleeping, and tonight I'll dream about hay and ice cream and turtles in the creek. Aah

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    26. A sweet tale about a girl growing up on a farm in the mid-west. The book highlights one summer full of fun and adventure. I like how the kids in the book are independent and spend all,of their time outside. They don't have tv or devices to entertain them. I didn't care for the subtle "girls can't do what bus can do" sexism. This one isn't as bad as some is the Newbery winners of the same era, though.Read July 2014, re-read in 2016.

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    27. 4 and 1/2 stars.I think all mothers wish for this type of lifestyle for their kids. Yes, we know there was more work but the idea that your kid could go hitchhiking and be educated and never hurt is no longer a possible thought. This is one of those idyllic summers of a real sweetheart of a girl. I loved the author's drawings as well as the story. Old fashioned with lots of home-town values, good families and good neighbors. If you enjoy a clean, hardworking summer novel, you will love it.

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    28. Quick, fun, and entertaining. I found myself thinking most about how unsupervised children used to be. Garnet wandered and wandered and wandered without any supervision at all. The results? She spent one night locked in the public library, and spent another day hitchhiking nineteen miles away and back. Oh, how free and simple things once were

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    29. A charming tale in the same league as the Little House in the Big Wood and The Family at One End Street. Like a friend of mine on GR would say, there’s no ‘villain’ in this one and he would be right. This is a story merely of life—in a much simpler time—life which was not easy but happy, full of little adventures, and of people who may not have had much but made the most of what they did!

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    30. I was given this book in 1st grade by my teacher. I fell in love with it. I read it over and over for years.I'm 38 now and still find it as wonderful. I also began collecting silver thimbles thenI now have quite a few. : )

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