Poems of the Night

  • Title: Poems of the Night
  • Author: Jorge Luis Borges Suzanne Jill Levine Efraín Kristal
  • ISBN: 9780143106005
  • Page: 273
  • Format: Paperback
  • Poems of the Night Revered for his magnificent works of fiction Jorge Luis Borges thought of himself primarily as a poet Poems of the Night is a moving collection of the great literary visionary s poetic meditations on
    Revered for his magnificent works of fiction, Jorge Luis Borges thought of himself primarily as a poet Poems of the Night is a moving collection of the great literary visionary s poetic meditations on nighttime, darkness, and the crepuscular world of visions and dreams, themes that speak implicitly to the blindness that overtook Borges late in life and yet the poems hereRevered for his magnificent works of fiction, Jorge Luis Borges thought of himself primarily as a poet Poems of the Night is a moving collection of the great literary visionary s poetic meditations on nighttime, darkness, and the crepuscular world of visions and dreams, themes that speak implicitly to the blindness that overtook Borges late in life and yet the poems here are drawn from the full span of Borges s career Featuring such poems as History of the Night and In Praise of Darkness and than fifty others in luminous translations by an array of distinguished translators among them W.S Merwin, Christopher Maurer, Alan Trueblood, and Alastair Reid this volume brings to light many poems that have never appeared in English, presenting them en face with their Spanish originals For than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English speaking world With than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up to date translations by award winning translators.

    • ✓ Poems of the Night || ✓ PDF Read by ß Jorge Luis Borges Suzanne Jill Levine Efraín Kristal
      273 Jorge Luis Borges Suzanne Jill Levine Efraín Kristal
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Poems of the Night || ✓ PDF Read by ß Jorge Luis Borges Suzanne Jill Levine Efraín Kristal
      Posted by:Jorge Luis Borges Suzanne Jill Levine Efraín Kristal
      Published :2019-09-19T21:03:26+00:00

    About Jorge Luis Borges Suzanne Jill Levine Efraín Kristal


    1. Jorge Francisco Isidoro Luis Borges Acevedo, usually referred to as Jorge Luis Borges Spanish pronunciation xo xe lwis bo xes , was an Argentine writer and poet born in Buenos Aires In 1914, his family moved to Switzerland where he attended school and traveled to Spain On his return to Argentina in 1921, Borges began publishing his poems and essays in Surrealist literary journals He also worked as a librarian and public lecturer Borges was fluent in several languages He was a target of political persecution during the Peron regime and supported the military juntas that overthrew it.Due to a hereditary condition, Borges became blind in his late fifties In 1955, he was appointed director of the National Public Library Biblioteca Nacional and professor of Literature at the University of Buenos Aires In 1961, he came to international attention when he received the first International Publishers Prize Prix Formentor His work was translated and published widely in the United States and in Europe He died in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1986.J M Coetzee said of Borges He, than anyone, renovated the language of fiction and thus opened the way to a remarkable generation of Spanish American novelists.


    390 Comments


    1. Here I am, writing into the night. I've explored Borges' Poems of the Night and it has been a much needed diversion from current events. The stars are still out, but the sky is a slate of gray around us, figuratively and literally. These are strange and depressive times and it would be easy to simply disappear into Borges' darkness, but there is still much beauty in it to decipher, so many silver sparkles against a dark gray.From: Ars PoeticaTo see in death sleep, and in the sunsetA sad gold - s [...]

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    2. Borges is drowning and he's describing the water, so beautifully that it's easy to spend a lot of time with his night poems and gradually dimming world. The content is bleak, sleep is an escape, dreams are traps and mirrors mock his blindness. Death, ashes, nightmares, a world without ice-cream, wellI don't think there was ice cream. The language, form and imagery are evocative, there is a patina stolen by the translation/s but that is par for course.There is much to admire here, much more than [...]

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    3. If you haven't been asleep for the last fifty years like Rip Van Winkle, you probably know that Jorge Luis Borges was blind -- not blind from birth, but from middle age onward. This collection of his poetry on the subject of night and dreams has particular poignancy as he transitioned from a fully sighted person to a man who saw the penumbra of sightlessness approaching him over the years to a blind man who waited for the ultimate night of death. In all three phases, he wrote poetry; and that po [...]

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    4. A nice review I found (of this text and the other Penguin publication of sonnets) with a few examples of the verse- quarterlyconversation/poemOne would be wrong to call Borges 'colourful', but perhaps the word is 'stark' that I'm looking for to describe his poetry. Not in a simple black and white divide either, but a winding, twisting, splitting medley of contrasting images. Along with Beckett, Borges was one of the true innovators in art at the close of Modernism. Unfortunately, the postmoderni [...]

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    5. I think I will always be reading this. It just gets better and better

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    6. Always am I in wonder that such depth and so many worlds could populate so few words strung together.

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    7. Ah, who knew there could be so much beauty in darkness?For Borges, it seems that the realm of blindness has brought upon an intensified imagination and memory of images, so much so that he often can not differentiate between dreams and reality. Blindness is a constant world of sleep even in a state of consciousness and Borges dwells upon how this ironically conjures insomnia.He shows us how he grapples with the difficulty of living a life with a handicap that makes everything appear in shadow re [...]

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    8. So nice to reread this book just a little over three years after I first encountered it. It would be crass to say that it merely "holds up." It does much more than that.

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    9. "There is no moment that isn't a load gun."This powerful collection was my introduction to Borges. There were some poems that were so impactful that I uttered words aloud when they were done (I actually said "damn!" or "wow" multiple times), others I shared immediately with a friend. There's a power in these meditations on darkness, dreams, and mortality. I am looking forward to reading more of Borges work.

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    10. To step foot into the world Borges painted in Poems of the Night is to step foot into a world where the night is endlessa gateway and a reflection of one's Self, of blue, bright, ephemeral days and of things long gone and things forgotten. The night, "that interval between two twilights", as Borges so aptly put it, is a mirror, a blessing, a mystery. It is everything and nothing at once.The poems are rife with paradoxes. Man was always at risk of becoming immortal, according to Borges, because e [...]

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    11. The master, truly. I remember first reading Borges as an impressionable kid in writing camp, with idealistic ambitions of becoming a great poet. Revisiting him now was just as revelatory. I intentionally picked this collection up as an exercise in catharsis. It pulls together the poetry he wrote about his particular journey through darkness both metaphorical and real as he lost his sight. Having gone through my own tunnel of medical darkness/meditations on mortality, it seemed appropriate. Yet s [...]

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    12. Just nu önskar jag innerligt att jag kunde läsa spanska bara för att få uppleva Borges poesi på dess originalspråk. Detta är en kort bok (desto mer så i och med att jag bara kan läsa de engelska översättningarna) men med ett oerhört innehåll. Dikterna, de flesta inte längre en en och en halv sida som mest, och prosadikterna har i många fall ett ödesmättat och sorgset skimmer över sig. Författaren blev som medelålders blind och lärde sig aldrig blindskrift så syn och ögon [...]

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    13. Reading Borges' poetry, especially this collection, is like chicken soup for the introspective insomniac's soul. That's terrible, but I did enjoy the surreal melancholy (almost Kafkaesque at times) of Poems of the Night. I keep going back and rereading my favorites, so I guess I'm not really "done" with it yet. Not a single star will be left in the night.The night will not be left.I will die, and, with methe weight of the intolerable universe.I shall erase the pyramids, the medallions,the contin [...]

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    14. There are books that are more than worth reading- books that sing off the page, books that are not easily set down. Poems of the Night, this superb collection of Borges poems regarding death, dreams, perception, blindness, and more is a book worthy of the praise given to Leaves of Grass or any collected volume of Emily Dickinson. They are simple poems in their elegance, but they strike deep, piercing into the reader's consciousness, the kind of book a reader knows will be reread throughout the e [...]

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    15. It would be so incredibly hard to translate poetry. Not all of the poems have the same translator and it is interesting to compare the literal meaning to the the way the translator chose to interpret Borges' poetry. I have never tried to read Borges in Spanish before because his writing, even in English, can be so much denser than other writers. This is great for people who are still working on their Spanish skills because it has the translation on the very next page. Jorge Luis Borges never dis [...]

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    16. Every poem was beautiful. Every poem was a revelation. Borges romanticizes insomnia and the blind and the dust we are all destined to become. He will make you fall in love with not seeing, not knowing and not caring that you don't know. His poetry is one endless love song and one endless night. Everybody should read this.

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    17. Favourites:Deathwatch on the SouthsideSt. John's EveConjectural PoemMuseum - BoundariesThe MirrorsLimitsIn Praise of DarknessThe SuicideEin TraumHistory of the NightTwo Forms of InsomniaPoem (Obverse & Reverse)SleepA Dream In EdinburghThe HorseThe Gift

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    18. Cuando a uno por trabajo le toca la ridiculez de leer a Borges en otro idioma, suele ser muy decepcionante. Pero esta traducción es decente y la edición bilingüe es un gran material para quienes trabajan con gente que no habla español, como yo, y están interesados en la obra de Borges.

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    19. Read more Borges than I expected, well, I love his poems better than his novels.

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    20. Reading one at a time, studying the translations. Studying how feelings change when the language changes. A prelude/preparation to translating my grandma's poems from Spanish to English.

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    21. sensual darkness. glory and the kingdom. shoddy city streets. pretty brilliant (for the most part).

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    22. Found a new favorite poet!

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    23. depths of understanding still to achieve. i feel very connected with this guy. you really should make time for this collection.

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    24. 'my god, my dreamer, keep on dreaming me'

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    25. Borges has somehow turned his blind sorrow into this beautiful collection — exquisitely exploring themes 'of the night': dreaming, darkness, insomnia, death, and the terrible concept of immortality.

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    26. Terjumpa terjemahan-terjemahan sajak yang tak selesai.

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    27. Some of the poems I absolutely loved, others I struggled to read. Borges is a talented poet, I'm just not a huge fan.

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