The Last Days According to Jesus

  • Title: The Last Days According to Jesus
  • Author: R.C. Sproul
  • ISBN: 9780801011719
  • Page: 297
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Last Days According to Jesus Analyzes what Jesus said about when he would return and the last days would arrive as in Matthew Defends the trustworthiness of Jesus teachings
    Analyzes what Jesus said about when he would return and the last days would arrive as in Matthew 24 34 Defends the trustworthiness of Jesus teachings.

    • Best Download [R.C. Sproul] ó The Last Days According to Jesus || [Thriller Book] PDF ↠
      297 R.C. Sproul
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      Posted by:R.C. Sproul
      Published :2019-06-04T22:37:00+00:00

    About R.C. Sproul


    1. Dr R.C Sproul 1939 2017 was founder of Ligonier Ministries, an international Christian discipleship organization located near Orlando, Fla He was founding pastor of Saint Andrew s Chapel in Sanford, Fla first president of Reformation Bible College, and executive editor of Tabletalk magazine.Ligonier Ministries began in 1971 as the Ligonier Valley Study Center in Ligonier, Pa In an effort to respond effectively to the growing demand for Dr Sproul s teachings and the ministry s other educational resources, the general offices were moved to Orlando in 1984, and the ministry was renamed.Dr Sproul s radio program, Renewing Your Mind, is still broadcast daily on hundreds of radio stations around the world and can also be heard online Dr Sproul produced hundreds of lecture series and recorded numerous video series on subjects such as the history of philosophy, theology, Bible study, apologetics, and Christian living.He contributed dozens of articles to national evangelical publications, spoke at conferences, churches, and academic institutions around the world, and wrote than one hundred books, including The Holiness of God, Chosen by God, and Everyone s a Theologian He signed the 1978 Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy and wrote a commentary on that document He also served as general editor of the Reformation Study Bible, previously known as the New Geneva Study Bible.Dr Sproul had a distinguished academic teaching career at various colleges and seminaries, including Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando and Jackson, Miss He was ordained as a teaching elder in the Presbyterian Church in America.


    906 Comments


    1. In “The Last Days According to Jesus” RC Sproul primarily examines the differences between radical preterism and partial preterism. In doing so he spends the majority of his time studying the Olivet Discourse in Matthew 24, Mark 13 and Luke 21. His purpose is 2 fold. The first, is when will the eschatological prophecies occur? The second, what is the significance of the fall of Jerusalem in Jesus’ Olivet Discourse? Sproul does not spend much time engaging other eschatological schools of th [...]

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    2. Summary: R.C. Sproul takes on the time-frame issues of the New Testament that seem to reflect an expectation of an imminent return of Christ and gives serious consideration to the preterist position that all or most of the predictions concerning the Last Days were fulfilled by the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.Understanding the "Last Days" predictions made in the gospels by Jesus as well as in the epistles and in the Revelation to John is among the most challenging areas of Bible study for [...]

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    3. I subscribed to Table Talk (Sproul's magazine) for 10 years. I have read most of his books. This is the only one of his I would not give 4 or 5-stars. Its not so much that I disagree with his conversion to postmillenialism and moderate preterism (though I do). It is more the lack of balance. He is usually pretty fair to his opponents, but not here. He quotes a very strident postmillennialist for his description of all four views! Then he has a chart where he classified Calvin and Augustine as po [...]

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    4. A worthy read though tedious at times, but that's the nature of what's being discussed here: sometimes a lot hangs on the translation or usage of a single word and R.C. Sproul turns these translation and usage questions over very thoroughly in this book. It will be good to continue reading books like this one though definitive answers about Revelation seem so elusive. Because I often couldn't tell which viewpoint Sproul was advocating, I did jot down the following, as it was as close as he came [...]

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    5. This book was, and is a game changer. It opened my eyes to a whole new way of looking at prophetic passages in the Bible. It convinced me that I (and most of my generation) was looking at Bible prophecy with tunnel vision -- i.e we were brainwashed by the predominant Dispensational views.

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    6. This book is primarily an exploration and defense of preteristic eschatological interpretation. Although this is written for a general audience, it is definitely an academic work. Sproul does not spend a lot of time explaining background principles of hermeneutics or Christian theology. He also avoids making many emphatic statements, preferring instead to present an argument and let the reader draw conclusions.Sproul’s stated purpose in this book is to evaluate the time-frame claims of Christ [...]

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    7. Excellent discussion and a different paradigm (for me) of what Jesus and writers of the NT meant when they talked about "the end". Were they talking about the end of the world or the end of the Jewish age that came about with the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70? When was Revelation written and why does it matter? The writer compares the major views of eschatology, including Premillennialism, Amillenialism, full Preterism, and Postmillenialism. I personally can see merit in all of these views e [...]

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    8. Sproul was both engaging and educational as I had hoped. His handling of scripture was above reproach and I appreciated his honesty. I feel I have a much better handle on both schools of Preterism now.Ironically I didn't know up front that it was an entire book dedicated to a fair critique of Preterism! I thought it would be his interpretation on the questions posed by the Disciples in the Olivet Discourse. I had read John MacArthur's take on it and I was excited to read Sproul's. While it wasn' [...]

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    9. Jesus is in danger of being charged as a false prophet. His Olivet Discourse teachings have come under attack from critics and skeptics who recognize the predictive nature of his prophecies and that all of the details never came to pass during the events surrounding the fall of Jerusalem in A.D. 70. This is the approach that R. C. Sproul takes to introduce what Jesus taught in his discourse with the disciples as they looked out over the temple.Sproul’s work is a valuable presentation which arg [...]

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    10. I wanted to give the book 4 stars, but I expected a few more concrete answers rather than a survey of the different views. The lack of the fourth star, then, is only because it didn't meet my subjective expectation, which very well could have been unreasonable.

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    11. This is an excellent book, and almost received 5 stars. The author starts the book by introducing the challenges to the prophetic parts of the bible: namely that when the bible repeatedly says that Jesus is coming soon, we have now waited more than 2000 years. From this starting point, Sproul investigates full and semi-preterist interpretations of those eschatological bible portions, which all confirm that most prophecy was fulfilled in the first century in keeping with the simple reading of the [...]

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    12. Sproul, R. C The Last Days according to Jesus: When Did Jesus Say He Would Return? Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2015.One of the most controversial topics among scholars and Christians in general is the day of the second coming of the Lord. There are many questions regarding this topic and one needs to go deep into the Bible in order to obtain some clues and provide conclusions for the many questions this topic arises. It is alarming the amount of writers who go beyond the Bible and present cle [...]

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    13. The world is a crazy place. You don't have to look around very far to see the evidence of that. There are wars and rumors of wars, famines and diseases- many signs of what the bible says will be going on when the Lord returns. There are days I sincerely pray, "Come soon, Lord Jesus." There are also plenty of people gaining fame and fortune for interpreting bible prophecies to mean that the End of Days are imminent. Blood moons, Jewish holidays and political situations- all portends of the last d [...]

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    14. I have read a few of R. C. Sproul's books, and this is my least favorite so far. He usually writes in a very readable manner - I will often finish a chapter of his after a seemingly short amount of time - but this book was not so. Almost tedious in places because (as other reviewers have stated) he spends more time quoting other commentators and theologians than actually telling us what he believes.Sproul is a partial preterist - specifically, he believes that the events of the Olivet Discourse [...]

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    15. I'm a bit torn in rating this. It wasn't a 5/5, but it wasn't a 4 either. 4.5 seems fair, but I wanted to give Sproul a little bit better benefit here after being so fair and clear in his explanations of the various eschatological camps and their distinctive views therein. Obviously, he leans toward partial Preterism, as do I, although he tends to reject the weightier matters of full Preterism quicker than I want to dismiss them. I've always admired Mr. Sproul, from his first book that I read (C [...]

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    16. Reading this book was very much like reading a commentary on J. Stuart Russell's book The Parousia. Dr. Sproul spends a great deal showing and discussing Russell's point of view of eschatology in relation to how he agrees or disagrees with Russell's conclusions. He ask some very good questions in relation to some of Russell's conclusions as well. His refutation of a fulfilled resurrection raised nearly as many questions for me as it does from those who affirm it. I did enjoy his inclusion of Max [...]

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    17. This review is also posted on Book by Book.Understanding the “last days” according to Bible is a difficult task, as many varying interpretations exist. In The Last Days According to Jesus: When Did Jesus Say He Would Return?, R.C. Sproul tackles several of the challenging questions regarding the “last days” and offers his interpretation of the words of Jesus. He does use a lot of quotations from scholars and commentators as support, which makes a bit tedious at times, but overall, the bo [...]

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    18. The last days according to Jesus by Dr. R.C. Sproul is a book that I have read in the past. However I wanted to go over it again to give myself a fresh perspective on what Dr. Sproul has taught.One thing that is definitely prevalent is that this teaching shays away from a popular teaching, set out by the Left Behind series, call the pre-tribulation rapture. Dr. Sproul teaches that most if not all of what has occurred in Revelation as well as some other texts was fulfilled in AD 70. This is known [...]

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    19. Anything written by R.C. Sproul is worth reading, and this book is no exception. I read this knowing very little about preterism, and certainly having a straw-man view of it. Sproul walks through a number of key new testament eschatological texts, defining both the full preterist and partial preterist views, with reference to how others have interpreted the same texts.The strongest arguments come from Jesus' discourse recorded towards the end of the synoptic Gospels. Sproul raises some significa [...]

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    20. I disagree with his conclusions, but it's worth a read. The first half of the book is a commentary on the full preterist, J. Stuart Russell. This is more than a slightly dangerous move on Sproul's part, since Russell was a full preterism. Further, it raises the tension that Sproul seems to be picking and choosing which parts of Russell's work he deems acceptable. And that's one of my problems with partial preterism: it seems to want to avoid the logic of its position.The second half of the book [...]

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    21. I read this book around the time of reading Gary DeMar's book "End Times Fiction." It didn't impact my life as DeMar's book did, but it was nice to see a popular writer coming to the same conclusions as I did. I went from classic dispensationalism to idealistic amillennialism to partial preterism (still amillennial though). Sproul's book was more deeply written (dealing with J. Stuart Russell's thoughts, and wrestling with a proper understanding of the parousia without a long discourse against " [...]

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    22. This book finished right when it was getting good. Lol. Honestly, I enjoyed reading this book. R.C. Sproul really helped to make clear how many of the prophecies we regard as future in its fulfillment were actually already fulfilled with the destruction of the Jewish temple. My only hesitation with this book is that in the beginning, he sites a book written by a full preterist pretty heavily. While he does make it clear that he does not endorse the heretical claims made by full preterists, my fe [...]

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    23. I'd say it isn't great, but it's good. It gives a nice overview of the biblical evidence for the partial preterist position, that some (but not all) New Testament prophecy isn't looking at what is (to us now) the future, but the past (specifically, the fall of Jerusalem in A.D. 70). As previous reviews noted, it is largely just quotes of others, so it is more of a summary of the arguments for it than a comprehensive apologetic for the view. But, I think Sproul is right for the most part, and he [...]

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    24. Helpful engagement with preterism in all it's varieties.This is an important book. Sproul sees clearly that the authority of Scripture and the credibility of Jesus' person are at stake. As it says on the back 'Sproul answers critics who claim Christ's teaching was 'defective''. And he does it well. Chapter headings (to give a flavour)1. What did Jesus teach on Mount Olivet? 2. What 'generation' will witness the end? 3. What 'age' was about to end?4. What did Paul teach in his letters? 5. What ab [...]

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    25. I first read this book many years ago. It quickly became one of the most impactful books I've ever read. I bought several copies to give away and loaned out my copy. Once I became aware of the evidence I became a Full Preterist. It is the most comprehensive, consistent, and logical approach to eschatology in my opinion. Since then I have defended and promoted this view. Though I don't know how long it will take, I think this view will eventually become one of the major eschatological views. I lo [...]

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    26. R.C. Sproul is my hero in regards to reformed faith. I truly love his teachings. This book, The Last Days According to Jesus, is my first let down from all of his thinking and teaching. I actually had a hard time reading it in light of his other works. My wish would be that he simply left this issue alone. I hate to say it but here he is outside his pay grade. It truly must be hard to be brilliant and to be so wrong on an issue. Yet I still love him and hold him in great regards. Sorry but I can [...]

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    27. About halfway through this book I gave up trying to figure out where RC was going with this title. I was disappointed that he didn't present anything I didn't already know or reveal anything I had not previously thought about. RC is very intellectual and I found him talking about philosophers and ideas that they espoused and he addressed those things. I kept waiting for some amazing eschatolgy doctrined waiting and waitinguntil I flipped through the rest to see if it ever got any better. I shelv [...]

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    28. One of the many great books looking at a more Biblical/Covenantal approach to eschatology. Preterism has been around throughout most all of church history, but has been lost in the shuffle of modern day futurism. It is great to see big name men like Sproul write about it. This book, as well as the masterful volume "Last Days madness" by Gary DeMar are great places to start if you are looking for a more Scriptural look at the "end times."

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    29. R. C. Sproul's work in THE LAST DAYS is a great introduction to the debate that surrounds the interpretation of New Testament expectation for the return of Christ, specifically as it relates to preterism. Sproul has a way of being careful from jumping too quickly to conclusions throughout the work,that makes this book a great objective read into the debate from one who is critical of "full preterism."

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    30. This is, essentially, a breakdown of the Preterist perspective of eschatalogical time in the New Testament. Very well written and analyzed with useful charts and scripture layouts. What I found most disappointing was that Sproul essentially took no stance in conclusion, leaving the reader hanging at the end.

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