Elizabeth

  • Title: Elizabeth
  • Author: Jessica Hamilton
  • ISBN: 9781557850010
  • Page: 318
  • Format: Paperback
  • Elizabeth From the flyleaf Elizabeth thought that she was a young girl like any other girl until the day that she looked into the mirror and saw the truth Her family wouldn t have believed it even if she had to
    From the flyleaf Elizabeth thought that she was a young girl like any other girl until the day that she looked into the mirror and saw the truth Her family wouldn t have believed it even if she had told them which she had no intention of doing Elizabeth had far different plans for them and only God could help them He didn t and Elizabeth set out to prove how heFrom the flyleaf Elizabeth thought that she was a young girl like any other girl until the day that she looked into the mirror and saw the truth Her family wouldn t have believed it even if she had told them which she had no intention of doing Elizabeth had far different plans for them and only God could help them He didn t and Elizabeth set out to prove how hellishly far she could go A strange and haunting tale Delta Democrat Times A shirlwind of horror Library Journal

    • Free Download [Children's Book] Ç Elizabeth - by Jessica Hamilton ✓
      318 Jessica Hamilton
    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Children's Book] Ç Elizabeth - by Jessica Hamilton ✓
      Posted by:Jessica Hamilton
      Published :2019-07-24T13:58:59+00:00

    About Jessica Hamilton


    1. Jessica Hamilton Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Elizabeth book, this is one of the most wanted Jessica Hamilton author readers around the world.


    108 Comments


    1. NEVER have I been so unsettled reading a book narrated by a 14 year old girl. But perhaps that is becauseElizabethis not your ordinary teenager. She's descended from a long line of witches and is now discovering the power within her. Or is she? You'll have to read this to find out!The prose in this book is simply outstanding. It's chilling at times because the narrator seems to have no feelings whatsoever. She talks about sex, acts of violence, and eating breakfast all in the same tone. Sometime [...]

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    2. One of my favorite horror reads of the past couple years, Elizabeth is narrated in the first-person by the 14 year-old title character, who one day finds she has magical powers, and discovers that she comes from a long line of witches. With the help of Frances, a long-dead witch who appears to Elizabeth in mirrors, she slowly gains more and more power, disposing of anyone who gets in the way of her quest for even more, including family, with a cold indifference that can be rather chilling . The [...]

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    3. ELIZABETH: A Novel of the Unnatural, by Ken Greenhall, was first released in 1976. This new version from VALANCOURT BOOKS includes an insightful introduction by Jonathan Janz. The story centers upon a young Elizabeth Cuttner, who believes that she sees an image of a woman named Frances, reflected in her mirror one day. Frances, she believes, is a witch that died centuries ago."Have you ever thought about mirrors?"". . . There really is no way to know whether your mirror shows you what others see [...]

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    4. **received the audio book of Elizabeth for a honest review. **wow!! I had to go back and check when this was first published. 1976. and Elizabeth is 14. this book is all kinds of fucked up. I won't go in to details as to why but just read the first page or listen to the first 30 minutes or so. there is so much "not ok" stuff happening here. with all that said, I loved the story. it's very 1970 witches and that's ok, that's a good thing!Becca Grabowski did a fantastic job reading. everything was [...]

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    5. ELIZABETH: A Novel of the Unnatural, by Ken Greenhall, was first released in 1976. This new version from VALANCOURT BOOKS includes an insightful introduction by Jonathan Janz. The story centers upon a young Elizabeth Cuttner, who believes that she sees an image of a woman named Frances, reflected in her mirror one day. Frances, she believes, is a witch that died centuries ago."Have you ever thought about mirrors?" ". . . There really is no way to know whether your mirror shows you what others se [...]

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    6. Ken Greenhall (aka Jessica Hamilton) is the stylistic heir to Shirley Jackson. The fact that he's been forgotten is a sign that the cultural gatekeepers are assholes.

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    7. Now available:PaperbackWebsite | US | UKeBookWebsite | US | UKAudiobook US | UK | Audible

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    8. 4 stars--I really liked it. Warnings for well, everything.This is 70s gothic/horror at its "finest" (if that's the word). It's lurid and purposefully shocking, but I'm a sucker for the tropes of the genre (the manor, the family secrets, the hints of the supernatural). The main character, Elizabeth, is only 14, but instead of going to school, she's seducing adults and plotting with her long-dead witch ancestor. I loved it!What sets this book above most others in this genre is the writing. Greenha [...]

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    9. I know a lot of people loved this book and I can't blame them because it is really good. Just something was eerie that turned me off. The protoganist is very darkly written almost like she has no emotion and maybe that was the point. I can't say I really liked any of the characters because frankly there was nothing to like. All seemed very manipulative and secretive, each harboring their own dark desires. I will say that Elizabeth was very wise in her years. She was very cunning and clever and m [...]

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    10. Elizabeth Cuttner is the narrator in this somewhat disturbing and twisted tale of a 14 year old who has a story to tell. Through a mirror in her room she is influenced by Frances a long dead relative and participant in the medieval practice of witchcraft. This unhealthy partnership unveils a side of Elizabeth that is totally at odds with the quietly spoken and articulate young lady presented to the reader. As the novel unfolds we learn of the tragic death of her parents, the disappearance of her [...]

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    11. I've been seeing this novel appear on various blogs I follow and finally have gotten a chance to read it. It's a short and very disturbing story from the POV of fourteen year old Elizabeth. Is she possessed? a witch? a murderer? a manipulative "bad seed"?, a victim of abuse? Or just someone far, far older than her years? Best for the reader to discover Elizabeth's story for themselves. Very much worth reading if you find a copy.

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    12. Usually not my type of book where the story is written through the eyes of a child, but this book is an exception. Really a book to find, though it is probably hard to come by. I read the Popular Lib. paperback edition.

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    13. Elizabeth was my first Ken Greenhall novel, and I am duly impressed. Greenhall's writing is fluid, descriptive, and perfectly elucidates the title character. The book was an enjoyable, elegant read and kept me guessing until the end, where things were left suitably ambiguous. Highly recommended to fans of Valancourt's previous releases and those looking for a good read that provides equal parts supernatural and thought-provoking observations on societal norms.I purchased the ebook, and the audio [...]

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    14. Probably not fair since I stopped in the middle, but this was pretty yawn-worthy for me. Under normal circumstances, I'd read a book like this in a few hours, but it lost momentum for me in the middle. . picked up a little at the end but not enough to finish strong.

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    15. This is one of the most unsettling books I have ever read. The descriptions are subtle and brilliant; the undercurrent of sexuality compelling.

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    16. The only issue I had with the book is that Elizabeth is 14 years old.

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    17. This out-of-print book has been widely recommended on the Internet and it does not disappoint. The title character is a precocious 14-year old girl, who uses sex and amazing insight into the psychological and emotional weaknesses of others to manipulate the adults around her. The description of the "Amorous Narcissist" personality type (from , citing Psychologist Theodore Millon) sums up her character quite well: "Sexually seductive, enticing, beguiling, tantalizing; glib and clever; disinclines [...]

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    18. I read this book when I was young and it began my love of reading and the supernatural. I lost my copy and could not seem to find another copy (had a hard time remembering the author but remembered the name since it is my own) but I finally prevailed and found another copy and just got done reading it again. Loved reading it as much this time as the first time.

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    19. Is there such a thing as a cozy horror? This really could have been fleshed out a little.

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    20. I'm not one to worry about subtitles, but in the case of this book, it's important. It's not "strange" or "weird" or "occult"; it's "unnatural". It's a specific word, used to evoke a specific feeling, enough so that it feels like it's part of the proper title, and not an attempt to classify the book. That "unnatural" is such a specific, evocative word isn't a surprise; Greenhall was apparently the kind of writer who took his time to find the perfect word for every sentence. Elizabeth reflects [...]

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    21. Much of my current reading is under the unhealthy influence of Grady Hendrix. He is the author of the irresistible study, Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of 70’s and 80’s Horror Fiction. Fortunately for both my time and my mental health, 90% of what he writes about sounds about as unreadable as it is impossible to find decades after it graced spinner racks in books shops and grocery stores. But when he recommends an author or a book, I’m finding him to be a reliable guide to the [...]

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    22. “We pretended that our appetites could be satisfied with toast and cereal; that our knowledge of evil was limited to what we learned of it from our morning newspaper.”ELIZABETH has all the things I want from a horror book, but I especially liked the mood. A dark, constantly spooky sort of atmosphere is crucial, and Greenhall succeeds here right from the start. Elizabeth is a strange, wiser-than-her-age 14 year old who gets visited by a mysterious woman that only appears to her in mirrors. Sh [...]

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    23. A classic witch tale from the 70s! Everytime you'll walk by an old mirror you will think from now on who might be inside getting in contact with you. I really liked the atmosphere in the house, the cast and the depiction of grandmother. Though I didn't like the relationsship between Elizabeth and her uncle James too much the story and the interaction of the characters is quite innovative. The author is writing quite a dry prose with fine phrases. A good gripping tale with a surprise ending!

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    24. Seriously unsettling and creepy. Told from the perspective of a 14 year old who is far older than her years, this is the story of darkness and evil. Elizabeth appears to have no conscience, yet part of me thinks her underdeveloped young brain allowed her to be manipulated by the spirit in her mirror. I think the fact that the narrator is only 14 makes this even more disturbing. A very good, quick read. Just what I needed after a weekend jam packed with work and homework.

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    25. what a lovely, creepy little tale the introduction sets the tone, but the book exceeds it surprisingly at every turn unsettling main character, much too young to do what she does, think what she thinks quite adept though at getting what she wants, at least seemingly the writing created the feel of a Hammer movie, plenty of moments that leave the reader feeling rather sullied and unclean somehow loved it

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    26. A bit disappointed by this one, as it seemed like there was tremendous potential. If you are interested in a lukewarm, witch flavored, soft erotica book-this may be for you.if you are looking for a decent occult novel in vain of Rosemary’s baby, Our Lady of Darkness, or The Matrix, this will not satisfy the craving. If you are looking for something to satisfy your Witchy wants, check out the novel Hex.

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    27. This book's got a pretty original premise and a bizarrely interesting protagonist. But it was just so obviously written by a man that I was never able to dive into the story past the obvious artificiality of how women actually act or speak or think (and the majority of characters are women). I don't know- this is a solid 3.5 stars, I think.

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    28. These young girls who are so secure in their seductiveness, so detached, self-confident and clear-minded, seem to be very popular with male authors. These writers have clearly never been a teenage girl.When your main character is an unrealistic cliché, the whole book inevitably suffers.

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    29. Ugh. Horribly boring book. I was 50 pages from finishing and just can't.

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