Vulgar Tongues: An Alternative History of Slang

  • Title: Vulgar Tongues: An Alternative History of Slang
  • Author: Max Décharné
  • ISBN: 9781846688287
  • Page: 328
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Vulgar Tongues An Alternative History of Slang Slang is the language of pop culture low culture street culture underground movements and secret societies depending on your point of view it is a badge of honor a sign of identity or a dangerous
    Slang is the language of pop culture, low culture, street culture, underground movements and secret societies depending on your point of view, it is a badge of honor, a sign of identity or a dangerous assault on the values of polite society Of all the vocabularies available to us, slang is the most alive, constantly evolving and as it leaks into the mainstream and is takSlang is the language of pop culture, low culture, street culture, underground movements and secret societies depending on your point of view, it is a badge of honor, a sign of identity or a dangerous assault on the values of polite society Of all the vocabularies available to us, slang is the most alive, constantly evolving and as it leaks into the mainstream and is taken up by all of us infusing the language with a healthy dose of vitality.Witty, energetic and informative Vulgar Tongues traces the many routes of slang, beginning with the thieves and prostitutes of Elizabethan London and ending with the present day, where the centuries old terms rap and hip hop still survive, though their meanings have changed On the way we will meet Dr Johnson, World War II flying aces, pickpockets, schoolchildren, hardboiled private eyes, carnival geeks and the many eccentric characters who have tried to record slang throughout its checkered past.If you re curious about flapdragons and ale passion, the changing meanings of punk and geek, or how fly originated on the streets of eighteenth century London and square in Masonic lodges, this is the book for you.

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      Posted by:Max Décharné
      Published :2019-09-19T22:53:33+00:00

    About Max Décharné


    1. Max Décharné Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Vulgar Tongues: An Alternative History of Slang book, this is one of the most wanted Max Décharné author readers around the world.


    393 Comments


    1. I think the book is pretty self explanatory, like the title says it's a history of slang. The book goes into what constitutes slang and the typical socialite feelings towards slang and then transitions into different slang words, dividing up the chapters loosely into different categories of words. The book traces many words to their etymology and original usage as well as their eventual acceptance and usage by groups other than the one that original began using the word to distinguish themselves [...]

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    2. Vulgar Tongues: An Alternative History of English Slang is a supremely enjoyable, informative and rigorously researched trawl through the wonderful world of slang in the company of Max Décharné.Thematic chapters take the entranced reader through the slang history of sex; prostitution; Cockneys, and other regions and countries; homosexuality; criminals; drinkers; drug fiends; music lovers; youth cults and subcultures; music; and the armed forces and services.Max Décharné is an author, songwri [...]

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    3. Hit or miss compilation for me. I didn't find much of interest until I got to the musical slang, where I found such gems as:"The proponents of Harlem jive talk do not hope that courses in the lingo will ever be offered at Harvard or Columbia. Neither do they expect to learn that Mrs. Faunteen-Chauncey of the Mayfair Set addresses her English butler as 'stud hoss', and was called in reply, 'a sturdy old hen.' " -- "Original Handbook of Harlem Jive," 1944.Bing Crosby, 1945 radio show: "Say, is it [...]

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    4. Breezy but well researched, this book does a "bang up job" of spotlighting the histories behind some really "fab" words and phrases.

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    5. Not narrative. Not history. Barely slang. There was no etymology whatsoever. There'd be the word, its approximate definition, the 70s crime novel it was pulled out of, and an occasional dad joke. If I'd wanted to read a list of jazz patois and olde English spellings of swear words, I would've looked up one of a thousand BuzzFeed lists and saved myself two hours. It gets 2 stars because the phrase "We're going to fist city" made me laugh. (It meant fighting, once.)

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    6. A breezy look at English slang words, how they've developed, and how they've changed over time. The author has a background in mid-20th century music, and it shows. Many of the examples come from jazz and rock culture. But he also thoroughly examines slang related to crime, the police, the human body, prostitution, illicit drugs, alcohol, sex and the military.Décharné is funny. He's from the UK, so much of the slang might be unfamiliar to American readers. But he does a pretty good job of cove [...]

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    7. Décharné's book covers the history of slang across the English-speaking world in a really interesting narrative style that makes the whole thing easy to read. Slang is separated by subject, so it's easy to trace the history of how we've talked about crime or sex over time. Some chapters have more information than others, but this is a well-researched book about our more vulgar languages tendencies.

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    8. Pedantic, but has interesting information. The chapters are sequenced fine, but the segments within are a bit too focused on one word, with little explanation for some others that pop up.I especially enjoyed the chapter on the '60s 'Uppermost of the Poppermost', though The Beatles are mentioned but not fully exploited.

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    9. Wow. I pretty much hated this book. Not interesting. The author tries to be funny and interesting, but he fails. He reminds me of a joke teller who begins the joke in English and delivers the punch-line in ancient Greek. ThudW: ixnay on the opeday is pig latin, not back slang or whatever the fock he calls it. He doesn't even know what pig latin is.

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    10. Informative and well-organized, but so very dry. I'm a word-nerd and I still kept running into whole segments of the book where nothing on the page sunk in, despite re-reading the passage several times.

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    11. I was expecting more of a history, but this was little more than a listing of slang terms organized loosely in categories.

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    12. Excellent compilation. I highly recommend perusing this wonderful tome.

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    13. Slang is everywhere, but may be on its last legs, this book says. That's but a side argument in a look at the development of slang in the English language.This seemed like a fun topic, and I was looking forward to learning more history about slang, but the book ultimately wasn't what I was hoping for. For one thing, I was disappointed that almost half the book was about sex, body parts or intoxicants. I guess that's where a lot of slang comes from, but it felt like those sections went on a bit t [...]

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    14. This took me an incredibly long time to finish. I think I mostly had issues with the layout of the book; rather than making it strictly chronological or topical, it sought to try and weave the two methods together. Spoiler alert: there is a lot of slang about sex and drugs. So, as the book moves forward through time, it also remarks upon the changing meaning of terms. This sounds impressive, but it ends up coming off as a bit choppy and repetitive.I did appreciate what felt like a self-contained [...]

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    15. Casting its net from Francis Grose to Sid The Sexist and from Elizabethan London to Bronx hip-hop, Vulgar Tongues enlightens and entertains in equal measure while engaging the reader much like a brilliant raconteur propping up the bar one stool down. With a presentation every bit as rich and colourful as the subject matter itself, the origins and evolution and endurance of slang are laid out in chapters devoted to drink, drugs, body parts and bodily functions, music and military, crime and much [...]

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    16. 417.209 D293 2017

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