The End of Work

  • Title: The End of Work
  • Author: Jeremy Rifkin Robert L. Heilbroner
  • ISBN: 9780874777796
  • Page: 174
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The End of Work Jeremy Rifkin argues that we are entering a new phase in history one characterized by the steady and inevitable decline of jobs The world says Rifkin is fast polarizing into two potentially irreconc
    Jeremy Rifkin argues that we are entering a new phase in history one characterized by the steady and inevitable decline of jobs The world, says Rifkin, is fast polarizing into two potentially irreconcilable forces on one side, an information elite that controls and manages the high tech global economy and on the other, the growing numbers displaced workers, who have fJeremy Rifkin argues that we are entering a new phase in history one characterized by the steady and inevitable decline of jobs The world, says Rifkin, is fast polarizing into two potentially irreconcilable forces on one side, an information elite that controls and manages the high tech global economy and on the other, the growing numbers displaced workers, who have few prospects and little hope for meaningful employment in an increasingly automated world The end of work could mean the demise of civilization as we have come to know it, or signal the beginning of a great social transformation and a rebirth of the human spirit.

    • Best Read [Jeremy Rifkin Robert L. Heilbroner] ✓ The End of Work || [Music Book] PDF ë
      174 Jeremy Rifkin Robert L. Heilbroner
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      Posted by:Jeremy Rifkin Robert L. Heilbroner
      Published :2019-05-10T16:39:25+00:00

    About Jeremy Rifkin Robert L. Heilbroner


    1. American economic and social theorist, writer, public speaker, political advisor, and activist.


    905 Comments


    1. UPDATE:New HeadlineThis Silicon Valley start-up wants to replace lawyers with robotsUPDATE:New HeadlineHow Can Working People Protect Their Incomes as the Robots Increasingly Take Over?UPDATE:New Headline:The Real Threat of Artificial IntelligenceAI "will reshape what work means and how wealth is created, leading to unprecedented economic inequalities and even altering the global balance of power." -- New York TimesUPDATE:New Headline:Some are worried will replace Whole Foods workers with robot [...]

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    2. We should get paid to not work. Very provocative, but necessary. The warning bells should've gone off a long time ago because of the opposing facts that companies don't want employees, but employees want companies. And with technology being more powerful than organized labor, who will win? Companies, of course, unless there's an intervention of government to legislate equality in the face of capitalism, and the intervention needs to start now."The End of Work" is an insightful confirmation of my [...]

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    3. A few weeks ago, I serendipitously found this title staring out of the shelf at me in Value Village while I was looking for a Halloween costume accessory. Besides Martin Ford's "The Lights in the Tunnel" which I'd read a year or two earlier, I honestly had no idea that there were other books on the subject. The End of Work is a much more solid, well-researched and carefully argued book than Ford's. And it's from 1995. Incidentally, it helped me discovered that there was a page on Technological [...]

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    4. Jeremy Rifkin's End of Work was published in 1995, yetseems even more relevant today; its major themes have evenbecome part of the current political discourse. That newtechnology has resulted in elimination of jobs and displacedworkers is not a new idea. but in the past new areas in theeconomy had emerged to make for new employment opportunities. The traditional sectors of the economy (agriculture, manufacturing, and service) no longer provide needs for full employment. New positions in the know [...]

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    5. Bueno, la portada es un poco así de FLIPAR donde han puesto en pequeñito "the" y "of" así que se ve gordo END WORK que podría ser la pintada de un colega o tu bio de tuiter.El caso es que Jeremy Rifkin no es El Revolucionario Definitivo sino El Socialdemócrata Definitivo, un señor que publicó este libro en 1995 y todavía estamos por ver que las políticas que propone (ha asesorado a organos de la UE y a jefes de gobierno como Zapatero) se cumplan. De hecho, la edición que me he leído y [...]

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    6. I read this book more than twenty years ago. Then I gave it away. Then in view of recent events, I thought that it was worth another read so I read it again. I'm glad that I did. It was a little bit like "Back to the Future".The first two-thirds of the book is a glum elaboration of the title. The last one-third is about the possibility of a silver lining on this very dark cloud of unemployment and poverty.The pre-1980 history part of the book could have been written in 2016. Nothing there has ch [...]

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    7. "The End of Work" sets up the problem of technological unemployment very well. Rifkin traces the broad technological and socioeconomic trends that have led to the rise of the service sector and now the erosion of those jobs. Interestingly (and controversially!) he presents the African American population as a demographic sector that has become a "permanent underclass" as a result of technological unemployment (he points out that in 1993 or so, 70% of all African American college graduates took j [...]

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    8. It was written in 1995 and I'm just now reading it in 2011. The author gives a good historical background to bring the reader up to the current era. Much of what he has hypothesized has come to pass, some is yet to be realized, but I do think that the only thing that is uncertain is the time-frame. Human labor will be phased whenever and wherever it is possible. The question will be how will societies that have been previously organized around human labor be organized in the future when it is mo [...]

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    9. Une analyse intéressante, des perspectives avancées. Date d'y à 15 ans déjà.

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    10. This is a +20 year old book, about technology, job market and globalization, but, still very relevant on current days. The author drives us into a very detailed scenario pointing out several characteristics of our current market and the world and how they are going to create a jobless future very near to us.The author also advocates on a growing share of third sector activities and non-lucrative occupations as a healthy and a valid alternative to the future when finding a job will be harder or e [...]

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    11. Utterly engrossing book. Easy read.

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    12. Das vorliegende Buch ist die zweite Auflage einer Betrachtung über „Das Ende der Arbeit“. Bei seinem ersten Erscheinen hat es für Wirbel gesorgt. Viele seiner Prognosen haben sich leider bewahrheitet. Nach wie vor beschwört ein Großteil der politischen Akteure die Notwendigkeit vom Wirtschaftswachstum, um der Arbeitslosigkeit den Kampf anzusagen. Ein wunderbares und beliebig einsetzbares Totschlagsargument beim Abbau von sozialen Sicherungen. Dabei kann man den Medien und auch Rifkin ein [...]

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    13. I read this book on the suggestion of a friend. In general, I'm not a fan. Here are some highlights.On the positive side of the book, Rifkin has obviously done a very thorough job researching employment throughout the century, various periods, etc. He also makes some interesting points with respect to the manner in which technology rids people of jobs. He does articulate that the net result is that production increases past the point of which the economy can absorb the excess. However, where I r [...]

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    14. When Rifkin wrote The End of Work in the 90s, the risks of automation were looming. He presented suggestions for avoiding a decent into dark age brought on by income inequality and an economically irrelevant population. He foresaw a world of equality, leisure, and fulfillment that we could actualize through little more than a change in attitudes about wealth and employment. The choice was ours.We decided that, indeed, a small minority should be cash rich but time poor while everyone else has the [...]

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    15. As I had the chance to see in previous works, Rifkin is great at doing analysis but quite dogmatic and naive when doing synthesis. In other words: "The end of work" is a great and enlightening overview of the undergoing revolution in work paradigms, where automation is replacing people and making them mostly useless: it provides figures and an historical perspective, showing us what is coming in our direction. For that part, the book is a 5-star.Then comes the suggested solution, and Rifkin beco [...]

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    16. Rifkin must have had some very busy researchers on this one. It reads like a compendium of statistics and anecdotes on everything and anything. Its also very boring.The main issues other than boredom come towards the end with his savior "the Third Sector" (the volunteer sector, NGOs, Community and Church Groups etc) as though somehow these groups will be able to meet the failings of the market /government. But its hard to see how volunteering is really going to provide food, housing or medical s [...]

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    17. I read this book because I'm writing my M.A. thesis about technological unemployment and the future of the digital economy. Given all that's going on with technology today (e.g driver-less cars), I figured this would be an interesting read. And, for the most part, it was. On one hand, I think Rifkin presciently diagnosed an interesting problem, and in a Marxian vain. However, I think he makes some grand assertions in the book that don't quite align with reality. Rifkin also peppers readers with [...]

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    18. Mildly persuasive, but long in the tooth, this book makes the case that work, in the traditional sense, is going to decrease in the future, due to increases in productivity brought about by technology. He sees this headed in one of two directions: unemployment skyrockets and crime goes up, or, his proposed alternative, that we mobilize all this manpower where they're needed: non-profit organizations, the "third sector."The rest of the book is a shockingly large number of pages are devoted to cel [...]

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    19. Blaming technological innovations for unemployment, a tired and old canard. Rifkin's ideological ancestors many thousands of years ago certainly complained that the development of the wheel increased unemployment, much like Obama blamed ATMs for displacing jobs for bank employees. Rifkin stops short of predicting that the future will be some form of Star Trek utopia where all of our needs, from basic to advanced, are fulfilled by machines. Rifkin seems to vie for dictatorial/technocratic society [...]

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    20. A more intelligent argument than most I have heard for something other than a market economy (for which I remain an advocate). Rifkin argues that the advances in technology are quickly taking us to a state in which few workers are needed. The resulting unemployment and free time should lead to increased participation in the third sector of volunteerism and community service. He also makes a decent case for a negative income tax for certain low incomes, which in my opinion, beats the alternatives [...]

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    21. Apart from that book should have been written in 100 pages instead of 250 pages, the author makes sense. Man vs. machine and machine wins.What really surprised me about the book that Jeremy doesn't even mention population control. Maybe Jeremy doesn't know that the only reason Europe started having middle class is because of black plague that wiped out 40% of population and increased the wages of the remaining people.The book presents the problem we all know, that machines are faster, better and [...]

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    22. La fin du travail a été écrit en 1995, en plein débat sur la réduction du temps de travail. Meme si les premieres parties (plutot historiques et qui resument fort bien la problematiques sans pour autant apporter de grandes nouveautes) reste pertinentes, les dernieres (qui proposent des solutions) datent un peu.L'edition que j'ai lue comporte d'ailleur une preface actualisee de Jeremy Rifkin qui date de 2004 et qui montre bien que l'histoire va tres vite (n'est ce pas Mr. Fukuyama).La Fin du [...]

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    23. I really enjoyed this book and I though it had a lot of great things to say about a possible future. I especially enjoyed the parts on developing the third sector of the economy and the introduction of a guaranteed annual income. A lot of really interesting info but I didn't like how the book was organized and I felt he went too far into detail on economic matters which of course can be monotonous. Its also a little dated so you can actually track some of the info to see what has happened and wh [...]

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    24. There is so much Rifkin could have done with this book, but didn't. I was disappointed that more time wasn't spent discussing the transition to an automation economy. But alas, Rifkin is a socialist, and we can't see eye to eye on things economic. Bottom line: as the world becomes more automated, those who want to derive the benefits of automation had better become owners of the means of production.

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    25. Was für eine unsägliche deutsche Übersetzung. White collar worker werden da doch tatsächlich als Weiße-Kragen-Arbeiter bezeichnet. Die deutschen Sätzen ziehen sich trocken und träge über das Papier. Nach knapp 30 Seiten habe ich das Buch entnervt weggelegt. Vielleicht gebe ich dem Original mal eine Chance.

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    26. One of the first and best books so far on the complete redesign of our working environment. Jeremy insights on how the world has evolved much faster than the systems and mindset that support our jobs, is mind blowing. If you are entering the market right now or thinking about creating your own company, this is a must read.

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    27. Intriguing book. Few months since I read it but thing that sticks in my head is the rise of the 'third sector' - voluntary and charity initiatives - in the running of society.Is bout 10 years old so slightly dated but still very relevant.

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    28. Great book about the current technological economic trend. We all got to work and think very differently than pre-Roosevelt era. Government can not keep spending to save us. We must build our own biz's-small or large.

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    29. A collection of facts (or sometimes what the author wants to believe to be facts) about shortcomings at the end of the industrial age stringed together. Gives some positive ideas to think about, but is not an easy read and needs major revision to be updated for the information age.

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    30. This text is fascinating. It's thought provoking and stands as a "prophetical" critique of current and future civilization, just as Amusing Ourselves to Death and The Age of Spiritual Machines.

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