Comfort: A Journey Through Grief

  • Title: Comfort: A Journey Through Grief
  • Author: Ann Hood
  • ISBN: 9780393064568
  • Page: 118
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Comfort A Journey Through Grief In Ann Hood s five year old daughter Grace died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat Stunned and devastated the family searched for comfort in a time when none seemed possible Hood an
    In 2002, Ann Hood s five year old daughter Grace died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat Stunned and devastated, the family searched for comfort in a time when none seemed possible Hood an accomplished novelist was unable to read or write She could only reflect on her lost daughter the way she looked splashing in the bathtub the way we sang Eight Days aIn 2002, Ann Hood s five year old daughter Grace died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat Stunned and devastated, the family searched for comfort in a time when none seemed possible Hood an accomplished novelist was unable to read or write She could only reflect on her lost daughter the way she looked splashing in the bathtub the way we sang Eight Days a Week One day, a friend suggested she learn to knit Knitting soothed her and gave her something to do Eventually, she began to read and write again A semblance of normalcy returned, but grief, in ever new and different forms, still held the family What they could not know was that comfort would come, and in surprising ways Hood traces her descent into grief and reveals how she found comfort and hope again a journey to recovery that culminates with a newly adopted daughter.

    • Free Read [Crime Book] ↠ Comfort: A Journey Through Grief - by Ann Hood ↠
      118 Ann Hood
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Crime Book] ↠ Comfort: A Journey Through Grief - by Ann Hood ↠
      Posted by:Ann Hood
      Published :2019-05-26T17:01:50+00:00

    About Ann Hood


    1. Ann Hood is the editor of Knitting Yarns Writers on Knitting and the bestselling author of The Book That Matters Most, The Knitting Circle, The Red Thread, Comfort, and An Italian Wife, among other works She is the recipient of two Pushcart Prizes, a Best American Spiritual Writing Award, a Best American Food Writing Award, a Best American Travel Writing Award, and the Paul Bowles Prize for Short Fiction She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.


    915 Comments


    1. "I believe she would want me to miss her with every cell in my body. And that is how much I ache for her. My arms hurt from not holding her on my lap. My nose aches from not smelling her little-girl sweat and powder and lavender-lotion smell. My eyes sting from not seeing her twirl in ballet class. My ears strain every morning for her calling "Mama!" when she wakes up. My lips reach for her sticky kisses. At night I search for her.""Or perhaps that is love: a leap of faith, a belief in the impos [...]

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    2. Shortly after my son was killed, I read Joan Didion's " A Year of Magical Thinking". It was amazing in its description of loss that cannot be shared. However, I must say that Ann Hood has expressed the loss of a child better than anyone I have ever had the discussion with about the personal, singular, life altering experience. I have always said that I only know two women who can understand. Both have lost a child. I also knew two women when I was very young, and it was not until I lost my son t [...]

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    3. I hadn’t heard a lot about Comfort: A Journey Through Grief before I decided to buy it; I did so because as far as retrospective illness narratives go, it was unlike anything I’d read before. I have come across and loved a couple of accounts of women who sadly miscarry, and those who have lost adults (husbands or sisters, for instance) to terrible diseases, but I haven’t read anything about the loss of a child. In Comfort, Hood writes about the death and its aftermath of her five-year-old [...]

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    4. This is the story of a mother whose 5yr old daughter dies suddenly from a rare strep infection. The book was published 6 years after her daughter's death. I picked it up at the library because the book jacket mentioned knitting as part of a journey through grief, and I have found my own solace in crocheting. The book is somewhat disjointed, jumping back & forth in time. I had no idea that author had a step-daughter until chapter 9 (of 10). Mother's Days and birthdays and anniversary's of the [...]

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    5. A beautifully bittersweet little memoir about the death of Hood’s five-year-old daughter, Grace, from a mutant strep throat infection that attacked all her organs and left her dead in two days. Because it was written as a series of essays that appeared in other publications and anthologies, Hood keeps looping back to the two days Grace spent in the hospital, rehashing the surprise, the terror, and the tragedy. Hood couldn’t write for a full year after Grace’s death. The first piece she wro [...]

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    6. In Gretchen Rubin's The Happiness Project, there's a chapter on finding gratitude through remembering the fragility of life. To do this, Rubin reads a series of memoirs on loss. When I started reading Comfort, I asked myself again and again why someone would choose to read such a sad, sad book about the sudden loss of Ann Hood's 5-year old daughter. To feel relieved it didn't happen to them? To appreciate the small moments with their own daughters? My reasons were like Gretchen Rubin's - to reme [...]

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    7. I had many books about death and dying recommended to me after Ben, but this was the only one that really "got it", in my opinion. Probably because she also lost a child. I actually had a very hard time reading this, and found myself only reading a page or so at a time. I enjoyed it immensely, though, and plan to buy a copy to reread from time to time.

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    8. This will not be a five star for everyone. In fact, I'm not sure what anyone who has not lost a child would get out of it. I'm not even sure what you get out of it if you have lost a child. But for me, the utter dislocation and randomness of grief in its intensity (or not) and its literal insanity (or not), this description of the chaos of the mind rings true.But. Not for everyone.

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    9. Heartbreaking. Not to be read before bed. Not only did I lie awake thinking of all I could lose in my life, but I dreamed of loss as well.

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    10. I didn't feel this book was a real "comfort" for grief, until I realized that it was comforting to the 'author' not necessarily those reading it. She worked her way through her grief by writing her thoughts, some of which were really good, but most were thoughts and memories of her daughter.Favorite quotes:"Grief is not linear. People kept telling me that once this happened or that passed, everything would be better. Some people gave me one year to grieve. They saw grief as a straight line, with [...]

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    11. When a 5-year old child diesWell, I can't really even finish the sentence, much less write a book about it. Such loss is inexplicable. It is impossible to imagine, even by a person like Hood who makes her living from her literary imagination. The talent to do so must be immense.You have to do honor to yourself, your own emotions, the child, to the death, to the reality of how it happened. The details. The exact details. Details so exact you have to live your own worst nightmare over and over and [...]

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    12. Comfort: A Journey Through Grief was more difficult to read then any other grief book I have read since my son died. Ann Hood’s memories felt familiar. She wrote: “This was the unthinkable, thing every parent fears. And it had come to our house and taken Gracie. When I looked out the window, I wanted her to still be there, making bouquets of chive from the garden laced with purple myrtle. Or when I walked in the kitchen, I expected to find her there, standing on her small wooden chair, pluck [...]

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    13. Anyone who has read Ann Hood's works knows she's excellent at her tradeFORT is not her usual offering, but it's a must read, especially for anyone who has lost a child.Grief following the death of a child is said to be the ultimate grief and Hood testifies to that in this precious book.In 2002, her five-year-old daughter contracted a virulent strain of strep and within 48 hours, little Grace died. For a long time Hood couldn't write and understandably so.At someone's suggestion she started knitt [...]

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    14. Although I have never lost a child, I read Hood's memoir with such a visceral reaction: my body tensed, I cried, I yelled aloud, I wrote multiple curse words on multiple pages. . . in short, Hood's writing touched me profoundly. Having just finished Robin Romm's The Mother Garden and Meghan O'Rourke's The Long Goodbye a week earlier, I rated them on and looked to the right: there was Comfort: A Journey Through Grief. I had previously read at least two of the chapters when they had appeared as a [...]

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    15. This is a beautiful yet very sad memoir about the sudden death of Ann’s five-year-old daughter, Grace, from an aggressive form of strep throat. Told with integrity and honesty, Ann reveals just how tough it was and still is for her, four years later, to cope with her great loss.Grace was a beautiful, precocious little girl who was in kindergarten and learning, of all things, to speak Chinese!! Her older brother, Sam, just adored her and the two of them got along like two peas in a pod.Ann and [...]

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    16. In a way I hated and loved this book. I hated it because I really didn't like the author. I had an easier time sympathizing with her in the beginning when it was just a mother losing a daughter and what a terrible and tradgic loss it was however as the book progressed and she talked more about herself and her family I got pretty agitated.I loved that it was something I could talk to Heather about. I didn't realize how strongly I felt about adoption until I had a discussion with her. Adoption is [...]

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    17. Loved this book SO much. It's short--more like a long essay--but it packs a powerful punch. Hood writes about her grief following the unexpected death of her daughter at age five. Hood writes sparingly and beautifully not only about the irrational nature of grief, but also about the ways in which she and her family cope with their sorrow. My favorite passage is near the end of the book, when Hood is remembering driving her daughter home from kindergarten: "I realize that this is how mothers see [...]

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    18. It has been a long while since I have read a book that affected me in such a visceral way. Her writing about the loss of her child I don't know how to say it. I felt as though I was in the hospital room with them, weeping by their sides. I read the book over the course of a day and a half, but I think I would reccommend smaller doses. It is so very emotional. The chapters lend themselves nicely to a more leisurely pace, I think.Very authentic. If I were teaching a class on pastoral care, or on l [...]

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    19. I chose to read this book because a friend said Hood writes about knitting to alleviate grief, a special interest of mine. At first I was a bit disappointed because that topic was only mentioned in passing. As I got deeper into this brief book (short enough to read in a four hour plane ride), I came to appreciate the honest sharing of a mother's pain in losing a young child. Beautifully written, heartbreaking, and honest gave me some insight into the grief of my friends who have lost children.

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    20. During Morningstar: Growing Up With Books, author Ann Hood references a tragedy which changed the trajectory of her life in many way. Comfort: A Journey Through Grief chronicles the short life of her daughter Grace, who died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat at the age of five. Ann's grief is palpable, which is poured out onto the pages of this book. Comfort is a very moving memoir and takes the reader through Ann's grief process. Her way of healing is very personal and it took coura [...]

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    21. This book took me almost a year to read. Mostly because I couldn't read it nephew was murdered 3 1/2 years ago and I am still grieving for him. It is a silent journey that I am going through. Nobody understands but this book has helped me to understand my feelings. Thank you Ann Hood for writing this book. It has brought my tears back and has helped my heart to heal.Thank you.

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    22. Riveting. Ann Hood's other books - The Red Thread & The Knitting Circle were also very good but this personal, tragic story from her own life is compelling. It's a testament to what the human heart can endure and survive. Only 100 pages but one of those impossible to put down books.

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    23. A very well written true story that rings true in grieving the loss of a child.

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    24. This is more like a personal journey through grief rather than a novel. Some parts of the book are repeated and have been used in other books by the same author. Grief is not a linear passage and in the muddle of it, unusual activities allow the person grieving to be loose from the grief in order to lessen the pain. It is a comfort

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    25. Ann Hood tells the story of grief over the course of several years after losing her five year old daughter to an odd strand of strep. Grace, her daughter, was a vibrant young child that fell sick and within 48 hours was dead. The sheer shock alone of the event left Ann and her family in a state of desperation over where to go and what to do next. Absolutely inundated with floods of emotion, she details how tiny details or events in life would send her spiraling into a state of disrepair without [...]

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    26. I read this as a result of & after reading Ann Hood's fiction novel "The Knitting Circle" recently, which I gave 5 stars to. I also lost my daughter, (9 years ago this May) though under completely different circumstances than Ann did and before my daughter, Brianna, was born. Ann's daughter Grace was 5 years old.On 6/4/08, I wrote the following in the book (I do that unless it's from a library or borrowed from my Aunt!) at the end of Chapter 7 on page 110: "Frustrated a bit! Too repetitive! [...]

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    27. I wanted to read this book because of the Modern Love essay Ann Hood submitted to the NYT in 2006. I remember that it was my favorite Modern Love essay; it was also the most heart wrenching one I have seen yet.Not being a parent and not even having any plans to be one in the future or ever, I don't think I'd have any idea what it is to grieve for a child, especially a very young one, had I not read Hood's ML essay and then her subsequent memoir. I'm not really an overly sentimental person, thoug [...]

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    28. I think that I probably read this book too quickly. It only took a few hours to get read, so maybe I did not linger over it for enough time. Still, I have to give Ms. Hood a lot of credit. She is honest with her grief . . . it takes her years to clean out Grace's room, she leaves items of Grace's around the house and still uses them for comfort. While only individuals who have dealt with the loss of a child can ever really understand what Hood experienced, many of her observations are accurate f [...]

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    29. Comfort: A Journey Through Grief by Ann Hood★★★★ ½ In 2002 acclaimed author, Ann Hood, lost her 5 year old daughter to a rare strain of strep that was in the blood. One day she was playing and enjoying time with her daughter – 36 hours later her daughter would die. This is the memoir of her tragic loss and her dealings with it over a few year period.This memoir struck home. No parent wants to lose their child, regardless of age or situation; it’s a parent’s worst nightmare. This w [...]

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    30. This book was heartwrenching and difficult to read, but a very real and raw plunge into the world of unexpected grief and tragedy. The writing style was very relatable and vivid. Definitely recommend for anyone, but especially folks who have experienced grief and will find companionship in Hood's experience and emotions. A couple of favorite lines:"Time passes and I am still not through it. You go on with it lodged in you. Sometimes I feel like I have swallowed a pile of stones. Grief makes me h [...]

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