Mirtinas eksperimentas (PFAF, #206)

  • Title: Mirtinas eksperimentas (PFAF, #206)
  • Author: Robert J. Sawyer Jonas Bulovas
  • ISBN: 9986950961
  • Page: 328
  • Format: Paperback
  • Mirtinas eksperimentas PFAF Piteris Hobsonas netolimos ateities mokslininkas B tent jam pasirod tartina kod l i imant transplantacijai donoro organus lavonui reikia suleisti didel nuskausminan i j doz Pritrenktas savo pasteb j
    Piteris Hobsonas netolimos ateities mokslininkas B tent jam pasirod tartina, kod l i imant transplantacijai donoro organus, lavonui reikia suleisti didel nuskausminan i j doz Pritrenktas savo pasteb jimo, Piteris atlieka eksperimentus su mir tan iais mon mis Pasekm s gal net keli elektroniniai udikai, siaut jantys pasauliniame interneto tinkle

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      Posted by:Robert J. Sawyer Jonas Bulovas
      Published :2019-08-19T08:56:19+00:00

    About Robert J. Sawyer Jonas Bulovas


    1. Robert J Sawyer is one of Canada s best known and most successful science fiction writers He is the only Canadian and one of only 7 writers in the world to have won all three of the top international awards for science fiction the 1995 Nebula Award for The Terminal Experiment, the 2003 Hugo Award for Hominids, and the 2006 John W Campbell Memorial Award for Mindscan.Robert Sawyer grew up in Toronto, the son of two university professors He credits two of his favourite shows from the late 1960s and early 1970s, Search and Star Trek, with teaching him some of the fundamentals of the science fiction craft Sawyer was obsessed with outer space from a young age, and he vividly remembers watching the televised Apollo missions He claims to have watched the 1968 classic film 2001 A Space Odyssey 25 times He began writing science fiction in a high school club, which he co founded, NASFA Northview Academy Association of Science Fiction Addicts Sawyer graduated in 1982 from the Radio and Television Arts Program at Ryerson University, where he later worked as an instructor.Sawyer s first published book, Golden Fleece 1989 , is an adaptation of short stories that had previously appeared in the science fiction magazine Amazing Stories This book won the Aurora Award for the best Canadian science fiction novel in English In the early 1990s Sawyer went on to publish his inventive Quintaglio Ascension trilogy, about a world of intelligent dinosaurs His 1995 award winning The Terminal Experiment confirmed his place as a major international science fiction writer.A prolific writer, Sawyer has published than 10 novels, plus two trilogies Reviewers praise Sawyer for his concise prose, which has been compared to that of the science fiction master Isaac Asimov Like many science fiction writers, Sawyer welcomes the opportunities his chosen genre provides for exploring ideas The first book of his Neanderthal Parallax trilogy, Hominids 2002 , is set in a near future society, in which a quantum computing experiment brings a Neanderthal scientist from a parallel Earth to ours His 2006 Mindscan explores the possibility of transferring human consciousness into a mechanical body, and the ensuing ethical, legal, and societal ramifications.A passionate advocate for science fiction, Sawyer teaches creative writing and appears frequently in the media to discuss his genre He prefers the label philosophical fiction, and in no way sees himself as a predictor of the future His mission statement for his writing is To combine the intimately human with the grandly cosmic uscmillan author robert


    738 Comments


    1. The Terminal Experiment: A Substandard Crichton-style thrillerOriginally posted at Fantasy LiteratureRobert J. Sawyer is a very popular Canadian SF author, with many novels under his belt and several major awards, including the 1995 Nebula Award for The Terminal Experiment, 2003 Hugo Award for Hominids, and 2006 John W. Campbell Award for Mindscan. I hadn’t read anything of his so I decided to give The Terminal Experiment a try. It’s about an engineer who creates three artificial copies of h [...]

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    2. Always with that contrived ripped-from-the-headlines-plugged-into-a-thriller feel and the distracting sense that Sawyer's characters are just cameos of folks he met while researching his book, but you would think that after 50+ years of SF exploring the ramifications of AI and afterlife, Sawyer would come up with something more perceptive than just murderous AIs and a completely imaginary proof of soul-life. Another example of hailed Hard sci-fi that relies on arbitrary fantasy tools and measure [...]

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    3. Who else writes like Sawyer nowadays? This is thoughtful and engaging, sometimes even thrilling, as I've come to expect from him. I love all the different ideas sprinkled through, the predictions of possible near-future politics, culture, and technology. I love the 'exoticism' to me of the Canadian setting (and the view from there of the US). But this particular book isn't perfect, because it hasn't aged well, SF-wise. We still have VCRs, but can create fully sentient and self-aware AI. We have [...]

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    4. 4.0 to 4.5 stars. Excellent read. Well thought out premise that was very well executed. Highly engaging, original story. RecommendedWinner: Nebula Award for Best Science Fiction Novel (1996)Nominee: Hugo Award for Best Science Fiction Novel (1996)Nominee: Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel (1996)

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    5. I loved Flashforward by Sawyer. This book was good, but not quite up to the same quality as that one. Still I enjoyed it a lot.The Terminal Experiment took a little while to set up the story. The beginning wasn't uninteresting, just not specifically about what it proposed to be about. It did weed its way into that about halfway through and I ended up being satisfied.This book begins with a scientist in Canada who develops technology to assess when a person actually dies (not just when the doctor [...]

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    6. 4 stele pentru ideea inițială, 2 pentru realizare.Senzația că Sawyer a combinat două romane diferite într-unul singur. Premisa SF e exploatată doar ca intrigă polițistă, o intrigă slăbuță, facilă și destul de previzibilă.Premisa e foarte bună. Încercând să dovedească științific momentul în care creierul nu mai are activitate și omul moare, un cercetător descoperă o undă de energie care străbate ambii lobi și iese la propriu din craniu. Acea undă e numită unda suf [...]

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    7. As Robert J. Sawyer seems to be able to do so effortlessly; taking a series of very human circumstances, complex philosophical questions, futuristic ideas, and ties it all together to create an intellectually stimulating page-turner.

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    8. nhwvejournal/722787ml[return][return]This is not quite as bad a book as I had been led to believe. The prose is often leaden - in particular, the cringe-worthy opening passage which I think should be used as a model of how not to write in classes for impressionable young writers, and the numerous info-dumps idicating that the characters have read all the available scientific literature up to 1994 (which is a shame as most of the book is set in 2011). What appears to be the killer idea of the fir [...]

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    9. Reading Robert J. Sawyer's other work helped convince me of problems with the Hugo process. Since I was happier with the Nebulas I was surprised to see one of his novels on that list.I will give the Nebulas this -- they gave the award to a 2-star book rather than a 1-star one. But, man, this guy can't write as well as he thinks he can. "Pseudo was about fifty, and as slim as the Leafs' chances in the Stanley Cup."Not so good stuff.

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    10. Peter Hobson creates a scanner that can map the neural nets of the brain, and in the process discovers the soulwave. His wife reveals an affair she had. Hobson and his best friend Sarkar scan Peter's brain and develop three AIs to study immortality and life after death. Now, one of the AIs is behaving very badly. How can it be stopped?Sawyer makes me think of John Scalzi. His writing isn't too good, but the story is entertaining.

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    11. Nobody does courtroom drama like Sawyer. Although there's a fair bit of technological misfiring (wasn't this 1995?) It's surprisingly cogent and enjoyable. Ending is very typical, though.

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    12. The Terminal ExperimentI have yet to read a bad Robert J. Sawyer tale! True, I have not read a lot of them – the WWW trilogy, Flashforward, Mindscan – yet the flavor of these later stories pretty much began with his first Nebula award-winning novel, The Terminal Experiment.As the author explained in his preface, he wrote this in the 1990s during the infancy of the Internet and the World Wide Web and did not want to update the story, yet this does not majorly affect the relevancy of the story [...]

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    13. I am reading the Nebula Award winning novels in chronological order. This is the winner for 1996.Not all Nebula Award novels seem to me to be worthy of that recognition, but this one is. I found the book to be something of a page turner. I wanted to find out what happened to the characters more than I wanted a resolution to the mystery. The characters are very well developed with rich, full lives and confronting their own human failings. Of course, they are not completely real because this is sc [...]

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    14. This is a relatively early book in Sawyer's distinguished career. Which version of Peter Hobson has been committing murders?This is an entirely engrossing, story, a sci-fi murder mystery. As I have come to expect from reading all of Sawyer's later books, the story makes you think about a variety of philosophical and pragmatic issues that lie behind technology. In this case the issues arise when the main character creates a device that can capture a "soulwave", that energy that leaves a body when [...]

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    15. If I were to say that TERMINAL EXPERIMENT is typical of Robert J. Sawyer, I could not be paying it a higher compliment. You see, Sawyer (who won the Nebula award for this novel) gives me exactly what I want from sci-fi: heady, provocative concepts framed within a believable plotline. I’m not worried about literary turns of phrases or heart-thumping action scenes. No, in fact, the writers I like so much in this genre – Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, Robert C. Wilson, Joe Haldeman, as well as [...]

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    16. The worst rating here is 1, so I give it bad+1 rating. Because the idea is ok, but the development is so shitty, I can't imagine how it got an award. The science is shitty, psycology is bad, logic is by idiot for idiots.I will only deal with one point of shitty logic plus shitty science.(view spoiler)[Our hero discovers there is something that leaves the body at the moment of death and it goes somewhere. Immediately everyone assumes it's a soul and assumes it has certain properties and exactly t [...]

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    17. A simple idea, explored to some possible consequences. The simple idea is the improvement of brain-scanning technologies, to the point individual neurons and their connections can be mapped and their activity can be recorded. Through the visualization of the neuron activity during a person's final living moments, a small activity cluster is seen drifting through the brain and slowly leaving it, which leads to a possible "discovery" of the soul. This is the first intriguing consequence of the boo [...]

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    18. The Terminal Experiment definitely feels like a very early RJS novel. It contains the seeds for almost every novel he has written since then, but doesn't quite stand up to his current level of polish and pacing. It was still a thoughtful and enjoyable read. Well worth it for seasoned RJS fans who want to get a glimpse at where the writer cut his teeth, but each of the fascinating ideas in the book are much better fleshed out in later novels. Often feeling dated and oddly paced, it contains the e [...]

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    19. Wow This book hooked me from the beginning. I love how humans the characters are, even the AI seemed believable.I do admit, I didn't like how often "cheating" and "affair" came up, I understood it when it happened, no need to keep reminding me about it.Otherwise WOW, this was a great book. It makes me feel like it was the reason Wake happened because there were a lot of parallels, and it made me happy to think that these happened at the same time, or that The Terminal Experiment happened a littl [...]

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    20. It took me only two days to read this book. At first it wasn't that interesting, as it was a bit too much soap opera, but then things became intriguing and exciting. The thriller was well written and easy to read. The speculation aspect was interesting, as well. No wonder this won a Nebula.It was funny to read how Sawyer imagined the year 2011 (the book was published 1995). Some things were old-fashioned (computer interfaces, VCR's and videophones) and some things too futuristic (automatic cars [...]

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    21. Most of Robert J. Sawyer's novels fit into these categories:- are published "old school": serialized in Analog Science Fiction (and Fact)- have a thriller feel (sortof like a John Saul of science fiction)- the plot is on Earth, in the very near future- are of short length.This one obviously fits all of the above, and manages to keep you connected right up until the end with the interesting ethical dilemmas the characters face and the smooth writing style that RJS is capable of.

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    22. “But you know, Peter, this wouldn’t necessarily simulate true life-after-death. It’s life outside the physical body—but who knows if the soulwave carries with it any of our memories? Of course, if it doesn’t, then it’s not really a meaningful continuation of existence. Without our memories, our pasts, what we were, it wouldn’t be anything we’d recognize as a continuation of the same person.”“I know,” said Peter. “But if the soul is anything like what people believe it to [...]

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    23. This was the first Robert J. Sawyer book I read (back in the 90s), and I was immediately hooked. From that point on, I've made sure to read everything of Rob's that I can find. A great story, full of fascinating speculation on the science and technology of his premise, driven by characters that you can't help but love and hate.

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    24. My next Robert J. Sawyer, I keep liking his books, so I keep reading them. This one was an interesting take on the soul. The invention that Dr. Hobson invented seemed possible, and the story made for an interesting mystery. Not surprising, given his previous books I already read, this one also is set in Toronto.

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    25. Totally outdated read. I can see that the book would be interesting back in 1995 with the Internet "novelty", but today with so many stories written on AI it's nothing original. The book itself is an easy read. But I wouldn't recommend it. It doesn't make it to my "classic" bookshelf.

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    26. Excellent book and story telling.

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    27. Sawyer is always good

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    28. A somewhat disjointed, but exciting, futuristic look at what might happen with increased brain wave observation capabilities, and possible artificial intelligences.

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    29. This is the first thing by Sawsyer I read and I enjoyed it. The book was comple and thought provoking.

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    30. Great read. I could not put it down for long. I wanted to find out what happened in the end after the forshadowing in the beginning.

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