The Mouse-Proof Kitchen

  • Title: The Mouse-Proof Kitchen
  • Author: Saira Shah
  • ISBN: 9781476705644
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Mouse Proof Kitchen A deeply moving debut novel about a couple s struggle to love and accept their disabled child and keep their family together Anna is a planner So when she discovers she s pregnant she prepares for a
    A deeply moving debut novel about a couple s struggle to love and accept their disabled child and keep their family together.Anna is a planner So when she discovers she s pregnant, she prepares for a perfect new life in Proven e, France, with her perfect new baby to be Anna s partner, the easy going Tobias, shouldn t have too much difficulty tagging along after all, he sA deeply moving debut novel about a couple s struggle to love and accept their disabled child and keep their family together.Anna is a planner So when she discovers she s pregnant, she prepares for a perfect new life in Proven e, France, with her perfect new baby to be Anna s partner, the easy going Tobias, shouldn t have too much difficulty tagging along after all, he s a musician who rarely starts his day before noon But all that changes when their baby is born severely disabled.Anna, Tobias, and their daughter, Freya, end up in a rickety, rodent infested farmhouse in a remote town in France far from the mansion in Proven e they had imagined Little do they know that this is the beginning of what will become an incredible journey of the heart one during which they learn there really is no such thing as a mouse proof kitchen Life is messy, and it s the messy bits that make it count.

    • [PDF] Download ↠ The Mouse-Proof Kitchen | by ↠ Saira Shah
      270 Saira Shah
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      Posted by:Saira Shah
      Published :2019-08-14T13:42:17+00:00

    About Saira Shah


    1. Writer, reporter, and documentary film maker, Shah is daughter of Afghan author Idries Shah and sibling to Tahir Shah and Safia Shah She is named after her grandmother, Scottish writer Saira Elizabeth Luiza Shah, who wrote as Morag Murray Abdullah.Her film credits include Beneath the Veil, Death in Gaza, and Unholy War.


    985 Comments


    1. Το βιβλίο αυτό μου προκαλεί ανάμεικτα συναισθήματα. Η ροή της αφήγησης κυλάει αρμονικά, με την γλώσσα να είναι λυρική, με πανέμορφες περιγραφές για την φύση, τους ανθρώπους και τη ζωή στην Γαλλική ύπαιθρο, που δίνουν στο βιβλίο μια αίσθηση παραμυθένια, παρόλο που το στόρι δε [...]

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    2. Such a believable, heartbreaking read. Who knows what life's gonna throw at us, and how we'll cope. Would we do any better than Anna and Tobias? I doubt it. A really interesting read.

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    3. I usually have a lot to say or at least general points I like to mention in reviews but this time I feel so all over the place with this novel I really don't know what to say or how to begin. The novel begins with Anna and Tobias welcoming their daughter Freya into the world. Right from the beginning it's obvious that there's something wrong with her. While in the ICU of a an English hospital, they are given a vague diagnosis that their child is severely disabled. They at once begin to loathe th [...]

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    4. I truly love this book. It made me feel. It made me think. It had me all over the emotional board. I could not stop reading, falling asleep with the Kindle open to the page I was reading.Anna and Tobias go through a lot of swinging thoughts and emotions. I can understand it. I have a child, also a girl, who was born beautiful. Within her first year she would begin having seizures, at one point they were counted as 80 a day. Later I had custody of my grandson, another beautiful child. Within six [...]

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    5. I found this very bizarrewhat was it trying to be? Not anywhere near frothy enough for chick lit, not serious enough to be proper novel.Anna and Tobias are dealt a devastating blow, when they find out their child is disabled, yeah,I get that,I get how overwhelming and emotional and harrowing that ist sure the book does, there were times this read more like a story of renovation of French house, and child was forgottend often neglected, and left with bad careAnd they kept saying "we musnt love he [...]

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    6. The Mouse-Proof KitchenBy Saira ShahThis novel examines every parent’s nightmare (well, one of them - we parents have a lot to worry about): Anna and Tobias’s baby daughter is born with severe disabilities. Anna, a chef, and Tobias, a composer, are ill-prepared - perhaps no one is ever prepared - and conflicted. Although Anna bonds at once with baby Freya, Tobias holds back, afraid to love a child who will only bring them heartbreak.The couple decides, perhaps not all together maturely, to g [...]

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    7. Ένσταση για τον τίτλο. Εντελώς ασύμβατος με το ύφος του βιβλίου. Το βιβλίο περιγράφει την ανατροπή της ζωής της ηρωίδας με αφορμή τη γέννηση του παιδιού της. Η ζωή της η προσωπική κλυδωνίζεται, η επαγγελματική περνάει περίπου στην ανυπαρξία και καλείται να αντιμετωπίσει τι [...]

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    8. Did I enjoy it? No, in a lot of ways, because I found myself getting angry and outraged at the characters, their words and their actions. Was I involved? Absolutely, from start to finish. It was an emotional roller coaster. Would I have considered stopping reading? Not in this lifetime.Tobias and Anna are looking forward to the birth of the first child. Anna is a person who liked to have a plan and everything in place. But when she finds out their child, Freya, brought into the world by Caesarea [...]

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    9. This heart-tugging emotional story told in a memoir-like format is intimately introspective, brutally honest yet deliciously warm with dollops of life-affirming humor. The narrator is Anna, a chef who loves order and this is accomplished by planning out her life dreams. Her partner is Tobias, a charming musician who is more carefree in his approach to life. But they are soon in a spot that stops them in their tracks – daughter Freya is born with profound disabilities. Anna worries what if she [...]

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    10. dark humour but delightful novel about a couple who have a disabled child and move to south of france and to a ruin of a farmhouse and the trials of rebuilding a life and pressures of a relationship and a disabled child which the author portrays every well

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    11. Un buen ejercicio que no pierde pie con sentimentalismos.entremontonesdelibros

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    12. I received this as an Advance Reader's Copy (ARC) from Bookbrowse, and when I started reading it, I questioned my sanity in requesting it in the first place. Not because it's a terrible book--it's not. Rather, because a woman in her late 30s, six months pregnant for the first time with a much-anticipated daughter should probably not read a story about a woman in her late 30s who just gave birth for the first time to Freya, an unexpectedly severely handicapped baby girl. Anna's despair, frustrati [...]

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    13. I won this book from the First Reads program. The book begins when a British couple, Anna and Tobias, are having their first baby. The little girl, Freya, is born with brain damage, and will likely have many severe physical and mental challenges. The new parents are told that their child might never reach typical milestones, like talking, walking, or even recognizing her mother and father. Tobias is adamant that he does not want to raise such a disabled baby, and suggests leaving her at the hosp [...]

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    14. I heard delightful echoes of Candide, Nancy Mitford (*The Blessing*, *Don't Tell Alfred*), even Penelope Fitzgerald (*The Beginning of Spring*) when reading this terrific multi-faceted, tough-love novel. Try to imagine how tricky it is to sustain an over-tone of narrative voice that combines life's utter rip-heart stuff with laughter, but Saira Shah pulls it off trippingly with panache. You don't need me to tell you that today's conventional (and droopingly easier!) tear-stained default is the m [...]

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    15. It's hard for me to honestly rate and review this book because my granddaughter was born last April with some of the same disabilities as Freya, although fortunately much less severe. I think the author captured the mixed feelings that parents (and grandparents, too) have about a special needs child entering their lives. But there was too much else going on in the book with their move from England to a dilapidated beyond charming house in France. I also found some of the characters a bit unbelie [...]

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    16. This is a wonderful book that I think anyone would enjoy. The story seems like the landscape of upland Languedoc in which it's set -- variously harsh, bitter, joyful, drenched in life, stormy, sane-and-taking-stock, a bleak desert. The story of Anna, Tobias, and their massively disabled daughter Freya shows us something about love -- at its limits and beyond the limits. The characters are vivid, well-drawn. The images of the country changing throughout the year are beautiful, beautifully-evoked. [...]

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    17. I received this book for free through First Read. I loved this book. Life seldom turns out as we imagine it will. It certainly took a turn for Anna and Tobias and their new daughter, Freya, whose disabilities changed everything. Learning to cope, adapt, accept and move on through life is a journey for everyone in and around the family. You will be right there with them on the journey to experience the fear, the struggle, the pain and the joy and see how it all works out. You will certainly appr [...]

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    18. I am still not sure what to make of this book. It is well done, but I really wanted to beat the shit out of some of the characters most of the time, which is wrong in my mind. The author shares her own struggles with a disabled child in a fictional way, but any parent or anyone familiar with disabled children will nod along with many of the situations. Mayhap a bit too over the top versions of what could have been more realistic reactions may have given me the feeling of a higher rating.

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    19. I thought this story had believable characters and genuine emotion. It might have been a bit fluffy at times based upon the subject matter ,but it worked. I was reminded a bit of 'Under the Tuscan Sun' with the supporting cast of characters coming and going. I will look forward to reading more of this talented author in the future.

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    20. Mucna, tuzna i bas jaka tema - roditeljstvo i svo lepo ali i strasno sto to iskustvo donosi; tesko je bilo citati ovu knjigu ali kad je jednom zapocnes ne mozes a da je ne procitas do kraja u rekordnom vremenu.

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    21. Ein ziemlich trauriges Buch. Nach den ersten 30 Seiten habe ich gedacht, das fängt sichtut es aber nicht. Es gibt einem das Gefühl zumindest im Ansatz verstehen zu können wie die Eltern eines schwerstbehinderten Kindes sich fühlen. Es hat mich emotional sehr gepackt und jedesmal mindestens noch eine halbe Stunde nach dem weglegen noch nachgewirkt. Lesenswert!

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    22. In Saira Shah's debut novel, The Mouse-Proof Kitchen, Anna and Tobias's plans - to leave London for an idyllic cottage in Provence where Anna can raise Freya while working part time as a chef and Tobias can chase lucrative work as a film music composer - are thrown into disarray when their daughter is born. Unexpectedly, the doctors have told them that Freya has brain malformations that indicate she will have severe cognitive and physical disabilities and neither Anna nor Tobias feel they will b [...]

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    23. Reading this engrossing story put me on a roller coaster of emotions. A young couple, Tobias and Anna, are preparing for the birth of their first child when suddenly their lives turn into a whirlwind of drama, emotion and adventure relayed month by month over the first year of their new daughter’s life. Both Tobias and Anna search for a way to ‘escape’ the emotional burden of caring for their severely disabled but “perfect” daughter. They struggle with a fear of loving her and losing h [...]

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    24. The more I read, the more this book captured my interest and increased my compassion for the parents of a severely disabled child, Freya. At first thinking each selfish, I sympathized with both Annie and Tobias and the path each chose to survive emotionally, fumbling along in their own way dealing with the constant care and seizures of Freya. Sadly as happens in real life, the nurturing of their relationship often came last. To make their lives even more complicated, they move from London to a c [...]

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    25. After going through a family trauma that involved intensive caretaking, I found this book really hitting the mark about the ambivalence inherent in caretaking a helpless family member. There's no script for the welter of emotions involved in the uncertainty, drudgery, abnegation, resentment and threads of secret desire that the loved one would simply die instead of continuing to suffer, alleviating one of selfish desires not to continue caretaking and despite all of this, one is simply immolated [...]

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    26. I wanted to read the book because of its intriguing title. The topic is a difficult one - severely disabled babies. Anna & Tobias move from London to Languedoc, France, with their 6-week old severely disabled baby Freya - a "no-hope, no-future"child. They buy a dilapidated farmhouse on a hillside and try - ineffectually - to put it to rights. She's a professional chef who wants to start a cooking school, but first needs to mouseproof her kitchen against hordes of rodents. A tough, uncompromi [...]

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    27. Anna and her husband Tobias eagerly anticipate the arrival of their first child. When Freya is born, the parents learn she will never develop the way most children do, that she will live a short and difficult life. Anna and Tobias, nevertheless, buy an old home in France and decide to take each day as it comes with Freya. I suspect this is a very honest look at the anxieties and pain and burdens and resentment and, yes, deep love that comes with having a child who doesn’t grow and change as ex [...]

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    28. I received this book through first reads. Thanks so much! I made it through this book pretty quickly. It was a interesting story. It made me think. As a parent of two young children I just really had a dislike for these two people. But then how can I judge? I have not been in their situation. I really thought these two people were so selfish they have a disabled baby and all they think about is getting rid of her.As the story went on many of the choices they made were just wrong. Morally wrong. [...]

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    29. Do you ever read a book and think, "This feels too real to be fiction"?I kept wonderingwho does the author know who went through this? Because this must be exactly how it would be.After I finished, I read the author bio on the back. Turns out, this book was drawn from the author's own experience. Still fiction, but well inspired fiction.

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    30. When I read the blurb I thought this book would be predictable. I was wrong. I loved everything about this book, well written and throughly enjoyable. I laughed, I cried It had my emotions all over the shop. It made me stop and think about how lucky I am, and see a different view of parents struggling with children's illness and ups and downs.

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