The Shanghai Factor

  • Title: The Shanghai Factor
  • Author: Charles McCarry
  • ISBN: 9780802121271
  • Page: 300
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Shanghai Factor Charles McCarry is widely considered one of the greatest espionage writers of the all time and in The Shanghai Factor he returns to his roots with an absorbing tale of global skulduggery that leaves
    Charles McCarry is widely considered one of the greatest espionage writers of the all time, and in The Shanghai Factor he returns to his roots with an absorbing tale of global skulduggery that leaves the reader guessing at every turn.A young, unnamed spy is living in Shanghai in order to observe and absorb the culture and language so as to aid a shadowy U.S agency known oCharles McCarry is widely considered one of the greatest espionage writers of the all time, and in The Shanghai Factor he returns to his roots with an absorbing tale of global skulduggery that leaves the reader guessing at every turn.A young, unnamed spy is living in Shanghai in order to observe and absorb the culture and language so as to aid a shadowy U.S agency known only as HQ However when he meets a sultry and mysterious woman named Mei, they begin a torrid affair that threatens to expose him to HQ s enemies.Soon the head of HQ, Luther Burbank, gives the spy a task that will force him to risk everything go undercover as the American ambassador for a massive Chinese multinational conglomerate, and learn the secrets of their powerful CEO Chen Qi, whom HQ believes to be a front man for the nearly uncrackable Chinese Intelligence, known as the Guoanbu.Soon the spy finds that HQ isn t the only one tracking his every move, and the deadly Guoanbu may be aware of his true identity Danger lies around every corner, as the enigmatic Mei flits in and out of his life, yet every time he thinks he s closer to the truth, he finds himself drawn further into a deadly cat and mouse game between HQ and the Guoanbu that might not only end his life, but could upend the East West balance of power.

    • ó The Shanghai Factor || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Charles McCarry
      300 Charles McCarry
    • thumbnail Title: ó The Shanghai Factor || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Charles McCarry
      Posted by:Charles McCarry
      Published :2019-03-12T09:37:24+00:00

    About Charles McCarry


    1. McCarry served in the United States Army, where he was a correspondent for Stars and Stripes, has been a small town newspaperman, and was a speechwriter in the Eisenhower administration From 1958 to 1967 he worked for the CIA, under deep cover in Europe, Asia, and Africa However, his cover was not as a writer or journalist McCarry was editor at large for National Geographic and has contributed pieces to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and other national publications He is married with four grown sons His family is from The Berkshires area of western Massachusetts, where he currently lives.McCarry is best known for a series of books concerning the life of super spy Paul Christopher Born in Germany before WWII to a German mother and an American father, Christopher joins the CIA after the war and becomes one of its most effective spies After launching an unauthorized investigation of the Kennedy assassination, Christopher becomes a pariah to the agency and a hunted man Eventually, he spends ten years in a Chinese prison before being released and embarking on a solution to the mystery that has haunted him his entire life the fate of his mother, who disappeared at the beginning of WWII The books are notable for their historical detail and depiction of spycraft, as well as their careful and extensive examination of Christopher s relationship with his family, friends, wives, and lovers.


    641 Comments


    1. A new Charles Mccarry book is a major event in my opinion. My favorite author. Period. Runs circles around Lecarre and Littell, better than Furst. America's greatest writer of espionage. His books are as literary as any books out there. Yes, he is that good. "The Shanghai Factor" is a wonderful testimony to modern day espionage. While it is not on the same level as Mccarry's Paul Christopher stories, it is better than any spy novel printed in a long time. Do yourself a favor and start with "The [...]

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    2. The Shanghai Factor starts out strong as a spy thriller. I was immediately sucked into the story of the unnamed narrator in Shanghai and his adventures in espionage. This is summer reading at its best: you are transported to another country, a dangerous exotic locale where even speaking the language won't save you from peril, and as the suspense builds you are so into it that you can even taste the Yangtze River when the narrator is thrown in. McCarry seems to be using China the way LeCarre used [...]

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    3. This is a simple yet brilliant spy thriller. It keeps you hooked till the end. Is it in the league of John Le Carre? Probably yes. The narration is John Le Carre ones are bit complex, superbly pitched, rich, and very British. Here it is simple and lucid. This book should appeal to you if you read this genre.

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    4. The Shanghai Factor by Charles McCarry is the first novel I've read by this author. He needs no introduction given his plethora of other books on the subject of espionage so I'll begin with stating I enjoyed reading this book a lot. Our nameless hero is narrating the story as he travels between China and America on the mission of getting intelligence about CEO Chen Qi. CEO Chen Qi is believed to be the front man for the Chinese Intelligence known simply as Guonbu. We follow our spy as he becomes [...]

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    5. This book was not what I had hoped for in a spy novel set in China. It comes with a couple of key illusions.The first is the illusion that this book involves a lot of “tradecraft”, when it is really focused on psychology. There is little discussion of the technical aspects of espionage and the author is vague in areas where detail would have made the story more interesting.The second is the illusion of character. The story is told in the first person by the main character who recounts his th [...]

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    6. All the top-shelf spy fiction seems to be written by former intelligence officers. I'm not sure if there is some retirement program (some post-retirement class or retreat) that involves teaching former CIA agents how to write spy-genre fiction. McCarry's most recent novel is a good blend of the counter-intelligence spy novel (one mastered by le Carré and Littell) and the mentor/acolyte subset of spy fiction. All in all, 'The Shanghai Factor' was a compelling, basically well-written novel. I hav [...]

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    7. "Better than John Le Carre" according to Lee Child. Bollocks is it.

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    8. If you're an avid fan of 'spy' fiction and you love the tradecraft, cat & mouse games, chess-like thinking, and other aspects of these novels that make them so interesting, you'll love Charles McCarry's 'The Shanghai Factor'. In addition to all the building blocks that make great spy thrillers, throw in a lot of sex as well as exotic locales and you'll experience a winning combination. My only warning is that this is one of those stories that requires concentration on the reader's part. If y [...]

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    9. Paul Christopher, he's not, but this nameless narrator drags us willynilly to the end. I got up in the middle of the night to read half a dozen more chapters and then before the crack of dawn to finish it. Nameless is a bit repulsive and this is where I like repulsive characters -- in books and movies, not sitting in my living room. Kudos to McCarry, now 83, for bringing spycraft up to date with cell phones, thumb drives, etc. Can't wait for my Shanghai sister to read this so we can compare note [...]

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    10. Read this on Anthony Bourdain's Twitter recommendation: "Charles McCarry’s latest, 'Shanghai Factor' a glorious spy novel. Witty, knowing. Delicious." The first half had potential but it devolved into a boring, predictable mess. The writing is a classic example of why "show not tell" is advice given to every high school English class; there are pages upon pages of drab dialogue explaining what's happening without developing any character. There is no mystery, intrigue, inventive tradecraft, or [...]

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    11. McCarry's book captures the paranoid insularity of counter-intelligence work and the people who are drawn to it. The book has limited action, but high tension. It also offers a fascinating picture of Chinese culture as seen through the eyes of a Mandarin-speaking non-Chinese. It's ongoing issues==who is watched, who is the watcher--is consistently interesting, even if the villain on the piece is obvious. It is a book that is very heavy on intrigue.

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    12. Mr McCarry has no equal in this genre. This book was un-put-downable. Anyone who enjoys this genre should begin with "The Tears of Autumn." Superb. As a former deep undercover operative, his novels are as much truth as fiction. His plot development is powerful yet sublime. Protagonists are human, flawed, and reachable.

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    13. Nice spy novel incorporating double agents and lots of deception. But I have to admit that I was disappointed to have figured out the "bad guy" pretty early in the story. I guess I've read too much Agatha Christie to trust those I'm supposed to trust.

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    14. A taut spy story that maintains its pace (until the denouement when it seems a little hurried) and portrays the ultimate nightmare - who can you ultimately trust?

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    15. This Shanghai-U.S. East Coast-based spy thriller is reminiscent of the early works of John le Carré, where the question always is, Whom can you trust? And the answer: no one. At least that’s how the unnamed narrator, a new CIA recruit, chooses to operate. Paranoia 101. Throughout, it’s McCarry’s wry observations of characters and their situations that make the reading such a pleasure.Undocumented CIA agents, like the narrator . . never carry official ID. This absence of proof that they’ [...]

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    16. I am reading all of Charles McCarry right now. An excellent espionage book set in Shanghai with frequent trips back to the power cities of the East Coast: new York, Boston and Washington, D.C. A young spy (nameless and the narrator) working for a shadowy U.S. agency is approached by an enigmatic chief counterspy, Luther Burbank, to infiltrate a massive Chinese conglomerate and learn the secrets of it's power CEO, Chen Qi. There are woman, of course, and Chinese-Americans on both sides of the ais [...]

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    17. This is a well written subtle spy novel, exploring more, the tradecraft of the profession than the shootings and explosions of Bond or Bourne. I wouldn’t suggest that if you’re a fan of the latter it’s not for you, but be warned.Three observations from other readers. One, it starts well but but you will loose interest after the first third. Rubbish. Two it’s been compared to leCarre. Rubbish.And, three. The ending is rushed. Unfortunately this is an accurate criticism. I don’t understa [...]

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    18. A terrific spy story from his own point of view. He is a patriot, perhaps accidentally, and a spy, seemingly because other lives seem pale or futile. A chameleon, he looks for others acting inimically to his country. I felt the vertigo of reorientation as possible alternative scenarios play out in his mind. The suspense was palpable.

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    19. while i mostly dont run past the lecarre at the buffet, the plot of this one intrigued me. stylishly done and at a leisurely pace very similar to len deighton and le carreve me ludlum any day but sigh hes dead lets hope terry hayes is worth the wait for the next book after the pilgrim

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    20. The young American spy living in Shanghai is unnamed in Charles McCarry’s “The Shanghai Factor” -- a detail at first disconcerting, but in the end somehow right. In an era of Edward Snowdens and Bradley Mannings, it’s fitting that the fall guy for the real spy bears no name.He’s in his late 20s, went to a prestigious university on an ROTC scholarship rather than have his stepfather pay the tuition, studied Mandarin, fought and was wounded in Afghanistan and was recruited after this exp [...]

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    21. Mysterious Book Report No. 122by John Dwaine McKennaHere’s a true confession: I have been fascinated by spies, espionage and tradecraft ever since the 1950’s when I read that first issue of Mad Magazine and was introduced to the iconic Spy vs Spy cartoon strip with it’s two identical antagonists, battling to a constant and eternal draw. From then on, I have read every spy novel I could get my hands on, from Joseph Conrad to John LeCarre, Ian Fleming to Frederick Forsyth and Vince Flynn as [...]

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    22. THE SHANGHAI FACTOR. (2013). Charles McCarry. ***1/2.McCarry is likely the best American espionage writer around. This is his latest effort. The story is pretty thin; it’s more about the art of ‘tradecraft’ than about anything else. It follows the course of the adventures of an American spy based in Shanghai. He has, over the years, become proficient in the Mandarin language, and uses it to help assimilate him into Chinese society. He reports to one man, a shadowy figure in Washington, who [...]

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    23. Ok, right. Stop. Stop right there.If you are about to read this book thinking it is a spy thriller, put it right back where you found it, because you will no doubt be extremely disappointed.I feel as if I have just been floating on the river's tranquil surface, in a small dainty boat, being steered only by the bumps and nudges the boat makes against the river banks. That was my reading experience.Honestly, I have never read anything like this. As Alan Furst quotes, "Charles McCarry is a master o [...]

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    24. Publisher: Mysterious PressLength: 336 pagesFormat: KindleGenre: ThrillerSeries: NoCompleted: July 30, 2014Challenges: 2014, New Authors, - 60 booksWhy you should read The Shanghai Factor by Charles McCarry. As a spy mystery but I wouldn't call it a thriller, there's no violence —this is my first book by this author and it's come to my attention none of his books have any violence.The unnamed protagonist is well drawn as a Canadian who happens to be proud that he's an anti-American. Actually, [...]

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    25. Charles McCarry must be nearing the end of his long, distinguished writing life that draws on his years spent in deep cover for the CIA in Africa, Asia and Europe. In this latest outing, he is preoccupied with the feelings of resentment that can motivate people to betray their colleagues or even their countries. Moving from Shanghai, and then back and forth between Washington, D.C. and New York, the cat and mouse game intensifies along with the body count. McCarry uses the French Dreyfus Affair [...]

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    26. Supplied by HarperCollins New Zealand for a reviewThe hero is an unnamed American spy recruited by a CIA-like agency after being wounded in Afghanistan. Though he studied Mandarin in college he finds the only real way to learn the language is to live in China. There he meets a beautiful Chinese girl, Mei, after se crashes into his bike with hers. He suspects she’s a Chinese spy but begins a torrid affair with her anyway. Then he goes undercover as the American ambassador for a massive Chinese [...]

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    27. Charles McCarrey strikes out in a new direction with this masterly tale of spycraft in the new China of the 21st century. The emphasis here is on motive, and the goal is to occupy the high ground. Much like the classic game of Go, the moves of the characters are both simple and strategic. Each step is carefully thought out, but no amount of planning can avoid the changes which are created by a skillful opponent. At time the hero seems bound to fail, but is able to reverse the momentum of the gam [...]

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    28. I love McCarry's Paul Christopher series of books with all of their depth and complexity and extensive character development, and I was a bit disappointed that one of my favorite authors was leaving his well-plowed Christopher field for a new one. But then I read this, and it reminds me that McCarry also wrote the non-Christopher and classic Miernik Dossier. Like the Miernik Dossier, The Shanghai Factor is essentially a simple and linear yet brilliant classic spy novel complete with morally ambi [...]

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    29. I enjoyed listening to this narration. Stephen Bowlby is excellent--he does the Chinese accent, men, women--effortlessly. High praise!The story is complex and at times there were too many characters to keep track of, but the plot moves, the characters are well developed and believable, and the settings, especially in China, are beautifully described. The story centers around a low-level US spy who is waiting for orders for something to do. At the beginning of the story a young and attractive Chi [...]

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