Chrysanthe

  • Title: Chrysanthe
  • Author: Yves Meynard
  • ISBN: 9780765330260
  • Page: 101
  • Format: Paperback
  • Chrysanthe Christine the princess and heir to the real world of Chrysanthe is kidnapped as a small child by a powerful magician and exiled in a Made World that is a version of our present reality In exile sup
    Christine, the princess and heir to the real world of Chrysanthe, is kidnapped as a small child by a powerful magician and exiled in a Made World that is a version of our present reality In exile, supervised by her strict uncle actually a wizard in disguise , she undergoes bogus memory recovery therapy, through which she is forced to remember childhood rape and abuse bChristine, the princess and heir to the real world of Chrysanthe, is kidnapped as a small child by a powerful magician and exiled in a Made World that is a version of our present reality In exile, supervised by her strict uncle actually a wizard in disguise , she undergoes bogus memory recovery therapy, through which she is forced to remember childhood rape and abuse by her parents and others She is terribly stunted emotionally by this terrifying plot, but at seventeen discovers it is all a lie Christine escapes with a rescuer, Sir Quentin, a knight from Chrysanthe, in a thrilling chase across realities.Once home, the magical standoff caused by her exile is broken, and a war begins, in spite of the best efforts of her father, the king, and his wizard, Melogian And that war, which takes up nearly the last third of the work, is a marvel of magical invention and terror, a battle between good and evil forces that resounds with echoes of the great battles of fantasy literature.

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      Published :2019-04-13T00:24:12+00:00

    About Yves Meynard


    1. Yves Meynard est n le 13 juin 1964 Qu bec, mais la ville de Longueuil est son lieu de r sidence depuis de nombreuses ann es Auteur de plusieurs livres, dont neuf romans pour la jeunesse, tant sous son nom que, en collaboration avec Jean Louis Trudel, sous celui de Laurent McAllister, Yves Meynard a publi depuis 1986 une cinquantaine de nouvelles tant en anglais qu en fran ais puisqu il ma trise parfaitement les deux langues La qualit de sa production lui a m rit quatre prix Aurora, trois prix Bor al et le Grand Prix 1994 de la science fiction et du fantastique qu b cois Directeur litt raire de la revue Solaris de 1994 2002, il a t co anthologiste du cinqui me volume de la s rie Tesseracts Yves Meynard d tient un doctorat en informatique de l Universit de Montr al.


    112 Comments


    1. I spent two weeks trying to read Chrysanthe without hitting the halfway point. It's that experience where the bookmark never seems to move; whenever I sat down to read, I couldn't get far before my mind started to wander. With roughly three hundred pages left to go, I've decided to cut my losses.It starts promisingly enough. Yves Meynard introduces us to a little girl, Christine, who lives with her unpleasant uncle in a world similar to our own present day, but has vague memories of a very diffe [...]

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    2. I know I should be raving about the lyrical prose and masterful use of the language, and yes, Meynard writes most excellently. However, the result is hollow, a shell, something that feels as lacking in substance and depth as one of the made worlds described within the novel.I think part of my problem is that the novel is one of those so-called 'literary fantasy' novels, of which more and more seem to be appearing these past few years. The fantasy genre has always been looked down upon as nothing [...]

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    3. o.oLook I really enjoy books in which we find out the main character is a royal in hiding. Joyce Ballou Gregorian's Tredana trilogy and Paul Park's Roumania Sequence, not to mention Pamela Dean's Secret Country trilogy and Frank Beddor's Looking Glass Wars trilogy , are ALL based around this concept. And I *adore* those series. And to be truthful CHRYSANTHE sounded exactly like something I would love. Plus from a publisher I almost always enjoy (Tor) I thought this was a shoo-in for at least a 3 [...]

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    4. I really wanted to like this one, guys – the blurb sounded fascinating, and TOR kindly sent me a review copy so I could read it.But sadly, it wasn’t meant to be. It was well-translated – but that was about the only thing it had going for it. While the prose Meynard writes at first weaves a spell much like the old time fairy tales do, it turned into more telling than showing. And when he wasn’t telling, his showing was so slow that it felt like I was stuck in a bog – unable to move, and [...]

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    5. I have very mixed feelings about this book. First, I should probably explain how I read it, it give some context. While it is just one book, it is divided into three sections, and in some places you may find it offered as a trilogy, rather than a single book. This is how I found it, and I got access to the first book far earlier than the last two. I was faced with the choice of if I even wanted to read the book under those circumstances. In the end, I decided to just read the first 'book' and th [...]

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    6. When I read Meynard’s wonderful earlier work The Book of Knights, I marked Meynard down as one of the best writers in the fantasy genre and someone to watch. I waited eagerly for another book. I have it in my hands now: a thick tome published, unfortunately, in a small, non-geezer-friendly font size. Eleven p.m. at night, with an eye-strain headache and nearly 500 pages behind me, I sit and reflect on the story. And in fact, right now, I’m a bit afraid to go to bed. The scenes of graphic vio [...]

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    7. You know, for such an incredibly long book CHRYSANTHE was so unbelievably forgettable. Just a note on the sheer length: my copy is roughly 500 pages with microscopic font and margins that are maybe 3/4 of an inch. Look -The majority of the books I read are half that, usually creating a longer than required book but it reads quickly. Except this book wasn't shortened by it's tiny writing. Extend it out to regular reading font and margins and you're looking at something that could possibly be broa [...]

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    8. Apparently I'm in the minority here, but I burned a pan in the kitchen and put off important work because of being engrossed in reading this book. And this despite initial grave doubts about the whole secretly-a-princess plot (which had been rather overdone, don't you think?). I found the world-building fascinating - so similar to Zelazny's Amber universe, but also distinctly its own - and the tactic of having Christine hidden in a world that's almost-but-definitely-not our own makes her permane [...]

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    9. Not bad, but I'm not finding myself staying up nights wondering, "what happens next," either.Our protagonist has been raised in near-isolation since early childhood by an uncle. Her therapist, with the aid of recovered-memory therapy, has convinced her that she was a victim of long-term sexual abuse at the hands of her father, which was why she was taken away from her family.Then - a handsome young man appears. He tells her that he is a knight, who has been seeking her for years, and that all sh [...]

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    10. Unfortunately, this author set out to tell a brilliant idea with the wrong lead character. Meynard chose the Princess because it allowed the author to explore the made worlds and the real world through the eyes of a newcomer, but an info dump is an info dump is an info dump. It took four hundred pages of info dumping, to get to Melogian and Casimir, the heart and horror of this story. I'd recommend skipping all the way to Part VI, read the exciting bits, and thank me for the time I saved you. Th [...]

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    11. Christine is a princess of the magical world of Chrysanthe, but at the age of four was kidnapped and taken where she couldn't be found. With no real memory of her former life, she's dismayed at the appearance of Quentin, a knight of Chrysanthe come to take her home. Should she trust this man with a familiar voice? Because her "guardian" will not let her go easilyThe prose in CHRYSANTHE has a lyrical quality with some lovely imagery, and Yves Meynard clearly wanted to write the best he knows how. [...]

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    12. Standard fantasy fare with some twists and holes.Chrysanthe has a number of standard fantasy features. A lost princess. A young knight in search of her. An evil lord who wants her crown. A perilous journey. Magicans, monsters, mayhem and war. On these standards it delivers.There are a few different wrinkles. The made worlds. The Book. The Law.Chrysanthe is the real world. All others were made by wizards many years ago, but not too many. Chrysanthe is only 6,098 years old. Obviously the author ra [...]

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    13. ChrysantheByYves MeynardMy "in a nutshell" summaryA very big amazing book about a kidnapped princess who is the heiress to the world of Chrysanthe.My thoughts after reading this bookOk we go.le Christine has no mother. She has sort of hazy dark memories of another happy world and a lovely happy life but that's not where she is right now. She has an imaginary rabbity buddy named Tap Fullmoonwho may not even be that imaginaryd now lives with the mean uncle/wizard who put her in this place in the f [...]

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    14. Yves Meynard and Tor make it clear from the title – “Chrysanthe: The Complete Saga” (Tor, $15.99, 496 pages) – that readers won’t have to invest in three or six or 13 books to get to the conclusion of this story about a young girl who really is a princess hidden in a “normal” life on a very Earth-like world.Meynard takes this familiar childhood fantasy and works out the details, which don’t turn out quite as putative young princesses might expect. All of a sudden Christine, a tee [...]

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    15. This would probably fall more into a 3.5 stars category for me and I wavered back and forth between 3 and 4 stars, but went with the lower because there were just too many times I was left wondering what the story really WAS here. The first 126 pages were brilliant: a nail-biter of a chase, the development of a fascinating "real world" (and the novel concept that what we all live in is actually made up), and some incredible potential between the male and female leads in regards to their developi [...]

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    16. I really hated it. The voices felt flat and two-dimensional (Christine especially felt stereotypical), and all of the relationships were a painfully long string of dramatics. The large cast of characters are "stage" managed poorly, and you can't seem to truly get invested in any of them.It crawls along ridiculously slowly, which didn't at all suit the fast pace of the events being described. Many of the plot devices and twists were weird rather than innovative, which is what Meynard seemed to be [...]

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    17. Could not get into this book though I finally managed to slog through it. Some interesting concepts involved but could not connect to the main character: difficult to read when you don't care! And the constant harping on the faked/forced memories! Going through the fantastical experiences of changing worlds, battling demons, etc. would surely have knocked some of that garbage out of Christine's head!!

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    18. **I received my copy through First Reads.**Being an uncommon reader in High Fantasy, I decided to give this one a try. I had hoped it would be along the lines of Marion Zimmer Bradley or George R.R. Martin - meaning dense, but awesomely detailed. Unfortunately it stops short at dense, and Meynard spends too much time on worldbuilding to create compelling characters.

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    19. The writing is crystallinely beautiful, and he did some clever things with vocabulary that were always a delight to recognise. But that very beauty and cleverness have a distancing effect, so it ends up being a very clever, very well written meditation on fictionality, identity and the fantasy genre that I had immense trouble caring about.

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    20. Pleasantly surprised after reading other reviews. He has a great imagination and I enjoyed the background and history of Chrysanthe as much as the actual story. Not an involved plot but well written and interesting. If you like Guy Gavriel Kay, you may enjoy this.

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    21. A very old-fashioned sort of fantasy, weird and wonderful.

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    22. Not as bad as the reviews it has been getting, but still kind of a mess of a book. Neat ideas, good writing, but a flawed execution.

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    23. I can't finish this - I think it is possible there is a good book in here, but the style of writing is just not to my taste.

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    24. Yuck. Never could finish it.

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    25. My Functional Nerds Review: functionalnerds/2012/07/bo

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    26. The long-reaching consequences of implanting false memories of abuse were dealt with plausibly.

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