Madame Blavatsky's Baboon: A History of the Mystics, Mediums, and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America

  • Title: Madame Blavatsky's Baboon: A History of the Mystics, Mediums, and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America
  • Author: Peter Washington
  • ISBN: 9780805241259
  • Page: 194
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Madame Blavatsky s Baboon A History of the Mystics Mediums and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America Just before the turn of the century a renegade Russian aristocrat named Madame Blavatsky came to America claiming that man was descended not from the ape but from spiritual beings Thus began Theosoph
    Just before the turn of the century, a renegade Russian aristocrat named Madame Blavatsky came to America claiming that man was descended not from the ape but from spiritual beings Thus began Theosophy, the very first new age religion This thought provoking and often hilarious study delineates the course of Theosophy and other sects which have come down through the yeaJust before the turn of the century, a renegade Russian aristocrat named Madame Blavatsky came to America claiming that man was descended not from the ape but from spiritual beings Thus began Theosophy, the very first new age religion This thought provoking and often hilarious study delineates the course of Theosophy and other sects which have come down through the years Photos.

    • Free Read [Religion Book] ↠ Madame Blavatsky's Baboon: A History of the Mystics, Mediums, and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America - by Peter Washington ✓
      194 Peter Washington
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Religion Book] ↠ Madame Blavatsky's Baboon: A History of the Mystics, Mediums, and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America - by Peter Washington ✓
      Posted by:Peter Washington
      Published :2019-05-27T15:25:28+00:00

    About Peter Washington


    1. Peter Washington Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Madame Blavatsky's Baboon: A History of the Mystics, Mediums, and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America book, this is one of the most wanted Peter Washington author readers around the world.


    568 Comments


    1. This book traces the origins of the modern New Age movement through examining the lives and philosophies of its charismatic founders. Theosophy founder Madame Blavatsky was just the first of many who garnered spiritual street cred by claiming to be in contact with a secret brotherhood of ascended masters. Though there is ample evidence that Blavatsky was nothing more than a highly creative fakir, her attempt to build a new spirituality based on the common thread within all religions struck such [...]

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    2. Every once in a while I read a book that makes me wish I could sit down the the with the writer over coffee in some kind of setting which included lots of comfy couches and no distractions and have a conversation about people, history and human nature. Peter Washington writes with such a charming combination of humor, warmth and cynicism that he seems like he would be fun to hang out with.Madame Blavatsky's Baboon covers the history of spiritualism from the early 19th century through the 20th. H [...]

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    3. At the moment, Madame Blavatsky’s Baboon is out of print -- which seems unfathomable, since this tremendously entertaining book is also one of very few resources if you wish to puzzle out the cast of characters that launched the “New Age” in America. If you despair of ever untangling the Rosicrucians from the Vedantists, Gurdjieff from Ouspensky, or St Germain from the Secret Masters, here is your book.As a prospective reader, the most important thing to know about this book is that it is [...]

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    4. Don't let the title's emphasis on theosophy distract you; Washington covers dozens of influences on American "spiritual" culture in the 20th century. Theosophy was a huge influence, despite now being half forgotten, and much of our current baseline of ideas and images - auras, astral travel, hidden masters, and much more - were introduced by the theosophists, so it's natural to start there. But there is so much moreThis book was pivotal for me, and is one of the fairly few books that triggered a [...]

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    5. Washington crams an awful lot of information into this survey, which at times gives it a cursory feel. It is, however, a good introduction to the subject, especially for readers who go on to do more research on the people he discusses. It should be read together with Ronald Hutton's THE TRIUMPH OF THE MOON, which discusses the British material from the same period of occult history.

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    6. Muy buena descripción de los orígenes y de las calumnias que fundamentan la creación de la Teosofía. De referencia para la formación del espíritu escéptico. Describe claramente la formación de un movimiento sectario.

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    7. I love this book. It cleared a lot of sticky beliefs out of my head.

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    8. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky was an immigrant from Russia. Her father was Baron von Hahn, of German-Russian nobility. Her mother was a novelist. Colonel Henry Steel Olcott was a soldier who converted to Buddhism. In 1874 Blavatsky and Olcott met at the farm of brothers William and Horatio Eddy near Chittenden, Vermont. The brothers claimed to be psychics and they held seances. Blavatsky and Olcott founded the Theosophical Society in New York in 1875. Eventually, the Theosophical Society has many lo [...]

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    9. This book is written by a skeptic who does his research well and exposes Blavatsky, Gurdjieff and others, although he has a sneaking admiration for Steiner. I happen to believe a lot of gurus and spiritual leaders are half real and half con, no matter if they believe everything they say or not. One of my favorite books ever, because one of the bookstores I used to work for was Open Center Books, that had the sublime through the ridiculous and everything in between. What is the difference between [...]

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    10. The author went to great lengths to comprise a chronology of the new age movement. This book richly outlines Madame Blavatsky's foibles, triumphs, and failures. Chock full of facts and no filler, I found myself cross-referencing the other players of the story, it will make you view the new age culture and our folk heroes associated with it quite differently.

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    11. There is a way, ladies and gentle men, whereby, your spiritual strivings and meditational meanderings, appear… as a way of seeming as if all your spiritual pursuits are you seeking an ANSWER from Heaven… and divination and supplication being a type of ‘stooping’ of the soul, to merely downgrade itself to try to receive something from its own consciousness otherwise not available to its own conscious consciousness.The progression - of ages… the matter of your period in time. The ratioci [...]

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    12. If you ever want to know how Spiritualism came to America, this is the work for youHighly recommeneded.

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    13. The New Age movement began in the United States (1870s) with the Madame Blavatsky, a medium from Russia who received messages from the Masters (spirits) who always thought as she did. Despite obvious parlor tricks she gained followers and thus,Theosophy was born, a mix of Hindu and Buddhism with Christianity. Madame, who according to her won stories escaped assassins and went to Tibet as well as experienced many past lives, was suceeded by people just as colorful: Colonel Henry Olcott, her chum [...]

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    14. I am reading this book as part of research on a project of my own, or I would never have finished it. While it's a fascinating topic, the book is an awful bore. Washington's work was poorly served by a grandiose scope with a cast of hundreds of characters and not enough time spent developing them. New historical figures showed up constantly, often several in a paragraph, complete with truncated back stories for each. Thist left me intrigued and wanting more, or, alternatively, frustrated and ove [...]

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    15. I've only dipped into this book for background on esoteric thought and theosophy. Washington does a nice job detailing the complicated movements of many of the complicated players in his story. For instance, it must have tested his patience as a researcher and author to track Gurdjieff's career. The man made volatility and unpredictability part of his teachings. The book purports to tell the story of the rise of "western guruism" but this thread gets lost, in my opinion, amidst the details of th [...]

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    16. Excellent introduction to alternative spirituality that began in the 18th century and is still active in our modern era. The book begins with Swedenborg and moves on to Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. The narrative continues after the death of Blavatsky and the various people who attempted to gain control of the TS. I had no idea that Krisnamurti, Huxley, and Ouspensky all knew each other. The author does an excellent job of showing these relational and spiritual connections between vari [...]

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    17. Man, I thought modern new agers were a weird lot, they ain't got nothin on the original charlatans. Interesting, extremely funny and revealing, everyone who believes that ancient wise masters are advising them from ancient Egypt should review this book carefully, and then pick a new hobby (like stamp collecting or skin popping, neither of which are as irritating or as bad for a person).

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    18. I hate to admit it when a book beats me, but I just can't finish this one. It's so friggin' boring! There's plenty of good information here, but it's presented in such a dry fashion, I can only get through 10 pages at a time and even then my mind continually wanders. Ah well. Life's too short to waste on boring books.

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    19. According to this book, Madame Blavatsky and her ilk were a bunch of fakes and grifters. A bit of dry read, esp. since these are some colorful characters!

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    20. Interesting topic but I found it rather dry reading.

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    21. Another interesting, though sometimes long-winded, study of why reasonably intelligent people are duped into believing dumb things, and the amoral charlatans who thrive off these rubes.

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