The Vices

  • Title: The Vices
  • Author: Lawrence Douglas
  • ISBN: 9781590514153
  • Page: 137
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Vices Oliver Vice forty one prominent philosopher scholar and art collector is missing and presumed dead over the side of Queen Mary Troubled by his friend s possible suicide the unnamed narrator o
    Oliver Vice, forty one, prominent philosopher, scholar, and art collector, is missing and presumed dead, over the side of Queen Mary 2.Troubled by his friend s possible suicide, the unnamed narrator of Lawrence Douglas new novel launches an all consuming investigation into Vice s life history Douglas, moving backward through time, tells a mordantly humorous story of fascOliver Vice, forty one, prominent philosopher, scholar, and art collector, is missing and presumed dead, over the side of Queen Mary 2.Troubled by his friend s possible suicide, the unnamed narrator of Lawrence Douglas new novel launches an all consuming investigation into Vice s life history Douglas, moving backward through time, tells a mordantly humorous story of fascination turned obsession, as his narrator peels back the layers of the Vice family s rich and bizarre history At the heart of the family are Francizka, Oliver s handsome, overbearing, vaguely anti Semitic Hungarian mother, and his fraternal twin brother, Bartholomew, a gigantic and troubled young man with a morbid interest in Europe s great tyrants As the narrator finds himself drawn into a battle over the family s money and art, he comes to sense that someone or perhaps the entire family is hiding an unsavory past Pursuing the truth from New York to London, from Budapest to Portugal, he remains oblivious to the irony of the search that in his need to understand Vice s life, he is really grappling with ambivalence about his own.

    • [PDF] ↠ Free Read × The Vices : by Lawrence Douglas ·
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      Published :2019-06-04T06:55:04+00:00

    About Lawrence Douglas


    1. Lawrence Douglas Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Vices book, this is one of the most wanted Lawrence Douglas author readers around the world.


    366 Comments


    1. The beginning of Lawrence Douglas’s elegant book, The Vices, begins with a Hegel quote: There was but one man who understood me, and he didn’t understand me.That quote is far more ambiguous than it first seems.At first, it seems as if the quote applies to the unlikely friendship between Oliver Vice, the wealthy, urbane, eccentric, and debonair philosopher, scholar and art collector and the unnamed and awestruck Jewish narrator. The narrator – a fellow professor – is besotted by Oliver, w [...]

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    2. This book may have rather limited appeal outside of the Amherst community (it's written by a poli sci prof), but for former students of either Alex George or Lawrence Douglas, the gossip is hard to resist. The title character, Vice, is a philosophy professor described to look exactly like George, with a similarly blue blood background and astringent personality. The novel starts strong, with the narrator (the Douglas-like character) puzzling over Vice's recent disappearance off the bow of the Qu [...]

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    3. I was so excited to read this book after hearing the author at the Boston Book Festival. The subject matter sounded great for a discussion- how do we really know someone? And I liked the idea of piecing together someone's life through the eyes of others'. I was promised travels and twists, and varyng chronology, and unreliable narrative. I feel like by the time I got to all these things I had waited so very long to experience, I was about 85% of the way through the book. And quite frankly, by th [...]

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    4. I came to this novel after reading the review in Tablet by Adam Kirsch, the New Yorker writer. Kirsch praised the novel's Nabokovian structure and the wonderful dynamic created between the unnamed narrator and the protagonist, Oliver Vice. The review might have come with a spoiler alert, as I think it gives away too much of the story, but otherwise I found it spot-on. The novel reads very smoothly and quickly, almost like a mystery, but the writing is quite beautiful, with vivid, interesting sen [...]

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    5. Who are we? How do our memories, histories and the stories we tell define us? How do we make sense of a person's life its end? These are the questions at the root of Douglas's novel The Vices. Haunted by the seemingly sudden and entirely unexpected suicide of his friend and colleague, Oliver Vice, the narrator attempts to piece together the shards of his friend's story as his own life unravels. Brilliant writing and structure. HIghly recommended.

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    6. review @ His Futile Preoccupationsswiftlytiltingplanet.wordpress

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    7. The second Lawrence Douglas I have read, after The Catastrophist, and I think he is a smart and entertaining writer who deserves a larger audience. This book contains an extended S&M slapstick scene, which is hilarious. I have often thought that that particular subculture could be effectively mined for comedy, and I was happy to see someone go there. There's also some great material about a dog, and many of the small details are just right (Oliver chews a baby aspirin every morning, for exam [...]

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    8. Lawrence Douglas's "The Vices" is one of the best novels I've read this year. Hands down. Douglas writes about the death - and the life - of Oliver Vice, a popular professor at a small liberal-arts college in Massachusetts (read: "Amherst") who is reported missing on the crossing of the Queen Mary II. He had been traveling from Europe to New York in the company of his mother, an aging widow. His reported death stirs up the conjecture about his mysterious life that has been part of his appeal to [...]

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    9. Like a flame to moths, philandering philosopher Oliver Vice is irresistible. He is also enigmatic, inscrutable, and narcissistic. But is he suicidal?The Vices opens with Oliver's death, a dramatic finish in the swirling waters of the north Atlantic into which Oliver pitched, or was pitched, from the Queen Mary II. Oliver's final days are investigated by the narrator, who remains cleverly unnamed, though he is at the story's heart. Indeed, his is the heart that pulses for Oliver's for the length [...]

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    10. This book was largely not what I expected. I tend to read mysteries, and from the description inside the front cover of this book, that's what I was anticipating with The Vices. The beginning of the book does have a very mystery-oriented feel to it, but the rest of the book is something different altogether. It's more an observation of a very strange man and his life experiences (and his relationships). The book felt somewhat stretched out and slow in parts, whereas others were fascinating but t [...]

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    11. I'd add a word about influences - to my ear, The Vices is written within the tradition of some of my favorite Philip Roth novels. If you like the early Zuckerman books, or the late ones, for that matter, those are the ones I'm talking about. It's similarly unafraid to be discursive, ruminative, thoughtful. And, admirably, Douglas manages this in under 400 pages, (without footnotes or endnotes!). It's a lot of fun to read. Maybe the sub-genre I'm referring to should be called Academic Tragicomedy [...]

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    12. Library Journal Review:In the genre of murder mysteries, the detective often maintains a calculated distance from his subjects so as not to cloud judgment and to avoid emotional attachment. Here, Douglas (English, Amherst Coll.) displays the emotional complexity of becoming the detective in your best friend's disappearance. The book begins with the disappearance of Oliver Vice, a philosopher and colleague of the unnamed narrator at Harkness College. On a quest to uncover the truth about his frie [...]

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    13. I won an ARC of this book from First Reads giveaways.The Vices is a story of the Vice family. A clinically depressed clan who also happen to be pathological liars, art forgers, smugglers, & extortionists. The main character in the book, Oliver Vice, is actually dead when the story is written. It's told from the point of view of his "best friend" a fellow college professor. The friend recounts the mysterious story of Oliver's death & then flashes back to occurances throughout their frien [...]

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    14. I thought this was a great read. Firstly, I find the author's writing style inviting and enjoyable. His use of language is precise without being pedantic and his "peripheral narrator", who is never given a name, feels wisely honest. Throughout the novel are interwoven themes of fraud, forgery, embellishment, little white lies, Whopping falsehoods and the many meanings associated with survival. Characters are never fully revealed which is truly how lives are experiencewe never know everything abo [...]

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    15. I thought this was a very fine novel --- and I'm no Amherst insider. What literate person reads novels for their gossip value? There's already enough of that crapola on the Net.The Vices did what I expect literature to do: it took me inside the lives of people very different from myself, and it made me think about the deep issues. What is the meaning of self? How does one invent an identity, and what are the costs of doing so? These are very American --- and very Jewish--- themes. Themes played [...]

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    16. This book started out strong with the promise of a murder mystery and to solve the suicide/murder of his friend. The book is well written but for me didn't so much meet the pleasure of murder mysteries. Half way in I knew more about the subjects but no real conjecture about a "murder mystery". To be honest, I got bored and speed read through the last chapters just to finish (I can't not finish a book - although I gave it some thought with this one). I like my mysteries to focus on the crime, not [...]

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    17. I started right into this book and was enveloped with the storyline. However, after 100 pages, I could see where the author may be taking the reader but it was no longer captivating. I then realized I was only still reading the book to try and finish it but really felt that the story was bland and had lost me altogether. After 150, I knew I was not going to see this to the end and I had other book adventures to jump into. I have spoken to others who agree that the book is not worth struggling th [...]

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    18. I recieved this book awhile ago from a giveaway and have been waiting to read it until i found a time where i didnt have to dedicate all of my day to studying. This novel deserves full attention; it follows the life of Oliver Vice through his unnamed friends perspective after he musteriously commits suicide. I loved every bit of it, found it to be one of those books that i just couldnt put down. The wordy text combined with the brilliant idea behind it all prevented me from sleeping most nights [...]

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    19. Before reading this book I read that some reviews said it may be difficult for those out of the area to really get into, but I have to disagree! This book was well developed, the plot made a lot of sense and the characters where intriguing and believable. I recommend this most certainly! **I won this book in a First-Reads Giveaway. My review is a reflection of my honest opinion and is not influenced by the fact that I got the book for free.

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    20. Not what I expected. The exploration of self and identity might have been interesting if the writing was better. The bleak humor is hit-or-miss, usually miss, and depends on the unnamed narrator being simultaneously intelligent and profoundly stupid (not to mention possibly not even real).Full review: skunkcatbookreviews.c

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    21. I really enjoyed this book. It was funny, mysterious, and philosophic. I liked that the book paced itself well and was just mysterious enough to keep you learning about the characters all the way to the very last page. Definitely worth reading.

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    22. Enjoyable inasmuch as much of it is an insider western Massachusetts dream. Slow discovery of the narrator's friend's life and history also good. Hard to overlook the upsetting, repeated characterization of dark jeans and french cuffed shirts as the height of fashion.

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    23. I liked it somewhere between a three and a four. A quote on the cover calls it a "whodunit," but don't believe it. It's a story about identity, both our own and the identity we prescribe to others. It's about family, history, and secrets. It's about what we do to protect the people we love.

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    24. received the book for free through First Reads.

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    25. A fun read that could have been more tight. Read my entire review here: cineastesbookshelf

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    26. The book overall wasn't bad but I didn't find it terribly entertaining. I completed 3-4 other books before I bothered to finish this one.

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    27. not favorite too long

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    28. 4.4Well paced. Right up my alley.

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    29. I don't know why this book is described as funny. I didn't find it remotely so, but a gripping account of the lies and truths that are told in recounting a family history.

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