The 1984 Annual World's Best SF

  • Title: The 1984 Annual World's Best SF
  • Author: Donald A. Wollheim Joseph H. Delaney Thomas Wylde Don Sakers Robert Silverberg Tanith Lee Mary Gentle Greg Bear
  • ISBN: 9780879979348
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Annual World s Best SF The latest collection of the finest science fiction tales published over the last year includes works by Isaac Asimov Robert Silverberg Frederik Pohl Tanith Lee and other masters of the genre
    The latest collection of the finest science fiction tales published over the last year includes works by Isaac Asimov, Robert Silverberg, Frederik Pohl, Tanith Lee, and other masters of the genre.

    • Best Read [Donald A. Wollheim Joseph H. Delaney Thomas Wylde Don Sakers Robert Silverberg Tanith Lee Mary Gentle Greg Bear] ✓ The 1984 Annual World's Best SF || [Comics Book] PDF ☆
      393 Donald A. Wollheim Joseph H. Delaney Thomas Wylde Don Sakers Robert Silverberg Tanith Lee Mary Gentle Greg Bear
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Donald A. Wollheim Joseph H. Delaney Thomas Wylde Don Sakers Robert Silverberg Tanith Lee Mary Gentle Greg Bear] ✓ The 1984 Annual World's Best SF || [Comics Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Donald A. Wollheim Joseph H. Delaney Thomas Wylde Don Sakers Robert Silverberg Tanith Lee Mary Gentle Greg Bear
      Published :2019-06-08T06:49:58+00:00

    About Donald A. Wollheim Joseph H. Delaney Thomas Wylde Don Sakers Robert Silverberg Tanith Lee Mary Gentle Greg Bear


    1. Donald Allen Wollheim was a science fiction writer, editor, publisher and fan He published his own works under pseudonyms, including David Grinnell.A member of the Futurians, he was one of the leading influences on the development of science fiction and science fiction fandom in the 20th century United States.In 1937, Wollheim founded the Fantasy Amateur Press Association The first mailing was distributed in July of that year and included this statement from Wollheim There are many fans desiring to put out a voice who dare not, for fear of being obliged to keep it up, and for the worry and time taken by subscriptions and advertising It is for them and for the fan who admits it is his hobby and not his business that we formed the FAPA Wollheim was also a member of the New York Science Fiction League, one of the clubs established by Hugo Gernsback to promote science fiction When Wollheim published a complaint of non payment for stories against Gernsback, Gernsback dissolved the New York chapter of the club.Wollheim s first story, The Man from Ariel, was published in the January 1934 issue of Wonder Stories when Wollheim was nineteen Wollheim was not paid for the story and when he began to look into the situation, he learned that many other authors had not been paid for their work, publishing his findings in the Bulletin of the Terrestrial Fantascience Guild Gernsback eventually settled the case with Wollheim and other authors out of court for 75, but when Wollheim submitted another story to Gernsback, under the pseudonym Millard Verne Gordon, he was again not paid One of Wollheim s short stories, Mimic was made into the feature film of the same name, which was released in 1997.He left Avon Books in 1952 to work for A A Wyn at Ace Books In 1953 he introduced science fiction to the Ace lineup, and for 20 years edited their renowned sf list Ace was well known for the Ace Doubles series which consisted of pairs of books, usually by different authors, bound back to back with two front covers Because these paired books had to fit a fixed total page length, one or both were usually heavily abridged to fit, and Wollheim often made many other editorial alterations and title changes as witness the many differences between Poul Anderson s Ace novel War of the Wing Men and its definitive revised edition, The Man Who Counts It was also during the 1950s he bought the book Junk by William S Burroughs, which, in his inimitable fashion, he retitled Junkie.In 1965 Wollheim published an unauthorized Ace edition of The Lord of the Rings by J R R Tolkien in three volumes the first mass market paperback edition of Tolkien s epic This was done because Wollheim believed the Houghton Mifflin hardcover editions failed to properly assert copyright In a 2006 interview, Wollheim s daughter claimed that Tolkien had angered her father by saying that his magnum opus would never be published in so degenerate a form as the paperback book However, Tolkien had previously authorized a paperback edition of The Hobbit in 1961, and eventually supported paperback editions of The Lord of the Rings and several of his other texts In any case, Ace was forced to cease publishing the unauthorized edition and to pay Tolkien for their sales following a grass roots campaign and boycott by Tolkien s U.S fans In 1993 a court found that the copyright loophole suggested by Ace Books was incorrect and their paperback edition found to have been a violation of Tolkien s copyright under US law.After leaving Ace he founded DAW Books in 1971, named by his initials, which can claim to be the first mass market specialist science fiction and fantasy fiction publishing house In later years, when his distributors, New American Library, threatened to withhold distribution of Thomas Burnett Swann s Biblical fantasy How are the Mighty Fallen 1974 because of its homosexual con


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    1. Introduction (The 1984 Annual World's Best SF) • (1984) • essay by Donald A. WollheimBlood Music • (1983) • novelette by Greg BearPotential • [Multivac] • (1983) • shortstory by Isaac AsimovKnight of Shallows • (1983) • novelette by Rand B. LeeSpending a Day at the Lottery Fair • (1983) • shortstory by Frederik PohlIn the Face of My Enemy • [Kim Ryan] • (1983) • novella by Joseph H. DelaneyThe Nanny • (1983) • novelette by Thomas WyldeThe Leaves of October • [Hl [...]

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    2. I have been enjoying Wollheim's anthologies immensely, albeit a mite tardily. He has attracted the best writers in science fiction. The short stories are generally top of the line, future Hugo and Nebula Award winners. If you're reading this, and haven't read this book, I highly recommend it. Reading time is precious, and I wish I had more, especially when I find a book like this that I can hardly put down.

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    3. My favorite story was the last oneautifully written and almost the perfect length. I wanted more of a denouement, but it was the only story in the bunch that I didn't want to put down. I've found at least one "new" author to read!

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    4. Since this is the 1984 edition, this collection has a strong dystopian sub-theme but not so much that you'd notice if you didn't know this was the 1984 edition, possibly because dystopian worlds are generally not uncommon in Science Fiction anyway. In the introduction, the editor makes note of the year and how it did and did not impact the selections but it's all really beside the point because when it comes down to it, Science Fiction is about the impact of current and potential future science [...]

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    5. This is a decent collection of Science Fiction short stories. I don't know if I'd really refer to them as the World's Best, though. I guess that's subjective.The first story, "Blood Music" was a rather shocking and slightly stomach-turning. The concept of injecting self-replicating intelligent microbes into one's blood has some far-reaching implications. What will they decide to do to you?The most fascinating, yet also the most confusing (to me, at least) was "Knight of Shallows." Roger is told [...]

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    6. Good authors, but one of the more depressing in the series. Lots of armaggedon's and bleak views of humanity.

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