Fallen Angels

  • Title: Fallen Angels
  • Author: Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle Michael F. Flynn
  • ISBN: 9780743435826
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Fallen Angels Having been shot down over the North Dakota glacier two Space Habs astronauts find themselves paralyzed by the Earth s gravity and at the center of a ruthless manhunt by the United States government
    Having been shot down over the North Dakota glacier, two Space Habs astronauts find themselves paralyzed by the Earth s gravity and at the center of a ruthless manhunt by the United States government.

    • ↠ Fallen Angels || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle Michael F. Flynn
      416 Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle Michael F. Flynn
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Fallen Angels || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle Michael F. Flynn
      Posted by:Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle Michael F. Flynn
      Published :2019-06-25T22:47:18+00:00

    About Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle Michael F. Flynn


    1. Laurence van Cott Niven s best known work is Ringworld Ringworld, 1 1970 , which received the Hugo, Locus, Ditmar, and Nebula awards His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics The creation of thoroughly worked out alien species, which are very different from humans both physically and mentally, is recognized as one of Niven s main strengths.Niven also often includes elements of detective fiction and adventure stories His fantasy includes The Magic Goes Away series, which utilizes an exhaustible resource, called Mana, to make the magic a non renewable resource Niven created an alien species, the Kzin, which were featured in a series of twelve collection books, the Man Kzin Wars He co authored a number of novels with Jerry Pournelle In fact, much of his writing since the 1970s has been in collaboration, particularly with Pournelle, Steven Barnes, Brenda Cooper, or Edward M Lerner.He briefly attended the California Institute of Technology and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics with a minor in psychology from Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas, in 1962 He did a year of graduate work in mathematics at the University of California at Los Angeles He has since lived in Los Angeles suburbs, including Chatsworth and Tarzana, as a full time writer He married Marilyn Joyce Fuzzy Pink Wisowaty, herself a well known science fiction and Regency literature fan, on September 6, 1969.Niven won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story for Neutron Star in 1967 In 1972, for Inconstant Moon, and in 1975 for The Hole Man In 1976, he won the Hugo Award for Best Novelette for The Borderland of Sol.Niven has written scripts for various science fiction television shows, including the original Land of the Lost series and Star Trek The Animated Series, for which he adapted his early Kzin story The Soft Weapon He adapted his story Inconstant Moon for an episode of the television series The Outer Limits in 1996.He has also written for the DC Comics character Green Lantern including in his stories hard science fiction concepts such as universal entropy and the redshift effect, which are unusual in comic bookscmillan author larryn


    872 Comments


    1. EDIT: I've been quoting and recommending this book a lot since I read it, which means I liked it more that I originally thought. Therefore I added an extra star.This book is both fun and depressing. Fun because of quirky characters and snappy dialogue. Depressing because of the setup- humanity, in particular the United States, having turned their back on technology, is fighting a losing battle against an Ice Age. The government writes off whole regions and populations, spending resources instead [...]

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    2. Another of the Baen ebook giveaways; this is Niven's, Pournelle's and Flynn's dystopian future-America novel where the Greens have won and dominated, at least, the north American political landscape. As a result, any anthropogenic global warming that there was is abruptly halted and instead a new ice-age sweeps down across the American landscape. While science is not banned outright, there is now the concept of appropriate science and inappropriate science. Inappropriate science is a large catch [...]

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    3. I was absolutely stunned. I love Niven and Pournelle, and when they get into a threesome it usually works too. I can't give this book an honest review because I gave up about 10 pages in. It was terrible!. First, this was written in 2002, still believing that we're going to be going into another Ice age. Yeah, I've always known Pournelle was an unbeliever, but most scientists haven't believed that for over 20 years. It's true that naturally the Earth is in a cooling cycle - but we've been pumpin [...]

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    4. A dated book, and definitely not Niven and Pournelle's best. Instead of global warming, the Earth is being covered by glaciers, thanks to those silly environmentalists and all their anti-pollution laws, which literally reversed the Greenhouse Effect. Two astronauts from the space habitats still orbiting the Earth are shot down over North America, and have to be rescued, by sci-fi fans. (Hah, see me use "sci-fi" deliberately just to annoy all the SF pedantists?) Half ego-fluffing for SF fandom, h [...]

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    5. "If life always fell short of your expectations, that was no argument for lowering them."Finally, fiction about fans, rather than fan fiction. Best "free" book yet. Niven, Pournelle and Flynn take us on a fast and fun adventure that is all the more fun for the improbability of it.It's hard to know what was meant seriously and what tongue in cheek. I abandoned my quibbles and go with the flow. Published in 1991 describing a future right about now (2012), the book reminds us how the rapid changes [...]

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    6. First, I have to note the amazingly ironic context in which I first heard of this book. In the C-Realm podcast #451, after John Michael Greer mentioned that his recent science fiction novel Star's Reach is the first to his knowledge that explicitly incorporates science fiction and science fiction fandom, the show's host KMO mentioned this title as another example of science fiction about science fiction. The irony is that the interview (and Greer's work in general) is about the very themes—con [...]

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    7. This book was ok, but it didn’t really grab me and keep me interested throughout the entire book. The premise is that, instead of the global warming that most people predicted, Earth entered into an ice age. Everybody’s attempts to "go green" and limit pollution actually helped hasten that ice age. The book is very U.S.-centric and we don’t really learn what’s going on in the rest of the world but, in the U.S there’s a glacier moving its way across the U.S. People are cold, resources a [...]

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    8. Subversively hilarious. It's the near future and Earth has slipped into an ice age, brought on by environmental activism. Turns out only soot has kept back the ice age since early in human history, and with the Greens in power, an insistence on clean energy has allowed the glaciers to take over with lightning speed. The government is committed to political correctness rather than actual science, which is overstated only in degree. Most of the examples of government overreach are based on actual [...]

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    9. Essentially, this book is wish fulfilment, casting SF fans as the heroes who have to rescue astronauts from a crashed spaceship. It's had a certain amount of influence, e.g. Imperial College Science Fiction society have adopted the "Psi Phi" logo (mentioned in the book) for their T-shirts. That said, some of the terminology is a bit dated; I've never heard anyone use terms like "gafiate" in real life, and modern fandom is more likely to use phrases from TV Tropes. Still, that's not a problem: th [...]

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    10. Small band of valiant romantics against the Proxmires (think early Algore types) of the world. Having grown up in Wisconsin, I used to play in Kettle Moraine, carved out by the glaciers 10,000 years ago. Personally, a little global warming ain't so bad. This book is great fun.

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    11. What is with the global-warming denial? Granted, this was written over 10 years ago, but I had already been reading about global warming in the early 80's at college. Sad, sad, sad. Does anyone know if these authors have come around?

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    12. For many years, I have used this book as a reference point to which all other science fiction books are measured. This book is absolute zero on my quality scale. I hated literally everything about this book.

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    13. It took me about three years to read this book. It's a novel of near future (written in 1991), where USA is falling apart because the Green Party has the power and glaciers are approaching from north (the ice age is their fault because they stopped pollution and reversed the global warming). Science fiction is illegal, suspected technophiles are arrested and conventions are held underground. SF fans come to rescue when two men from the space station shipwreck on earth. Can they avoid the evil an [...]

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    14. Not as good as the other collaborations I've read by Niven/Pournelle. Just an average read. It was a nice touch to see the authors thumb their noses at the global warming crowd. Environmentalists purposely destroying the environment to further their cause and strengthen their stranglehold on the mantle of power was the hidden motif behind the story. Bravo to you three writers for having enough balls to stand up and call a spade a spade.

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    15. I hate writing reviews so long after reading a book. Unless I’m actively thinking about a book during that time, I lose so many of my thoughts. I finished this book a week ago, but I simply didn’t have the time to sit down and collect my thoughts. Finally, I have the time. I’ll try my best to convey why I think this book is a three star book.Come visit my blog for the full review…itstartedwiththehugos

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    16. Re-read from probably a decade ago, when I was too young to get all the references. While I'm only giving this three stars, it really is a very enjoyable book, especially for true fen, GAFIATed or not, who understand that FIAWOL. The plot, in a nutshell, surrounds a pair of astronauts who crash-landed on the glaciers rapidly encroaching on North America (Canada is already mostly under ice), only to be rescued by a group of sci-fi fans - fans who, due to the current political climate - must actua [...]

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    17. This is a rather peculiar piece of science fiction.The setting is near-future - probably now-ish, given that the book was first published in 1991! The earth is in the early-ish stages of an Ice Age - all of Canada (at least - probably more but my knowledge of North American geography is shaky) being under the ice, and glaciers moving rapidly further south. (Apart from a token mention or so, the rest of the world does not appear to exist.) This Ice Age has apparently been caused, or at least hurr [...]

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    18. In the future Earth suffers another ice age. There are two sets of people involved in the story, “Downers” which are Earth bound humans and “Angels” which are those humans that live in two Space stations orbiting the planet. The Angels get the blame for Earth’s problems due to their need to siphon some of the air from Earth in order to survive. They, therefore, become enemies. One particular scoop ship crash lands on a upper mid-west glacier after being hit by a missile. The ensuing at [...]

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    19. I can't believe I'm giving anything but 5 stars to a Niven book - and especially to a Niven-Pournelle collaboration. Niven and Niven-Pournelle have written several books in my most favorite of all times.However, this one just didn't captivate me as others had. There was no captivating science in it (like the Ringworld, or a neutron star). There were no captivating alien cultures (like the Kzin, the Ptavvs, the Grendels, or the Moties). The character development seemed week (I never even really e [...]

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    20. Six-Word Review: Humorous look at next ice age.The earth is experiencing an ice age due to the total absence of outlawed greenhouse gasses. The Fallen Angels in the title are a group of disavowed orbiting space hold-outs who while trying to collect nitrogen from the earth's atmosphere are shot down. They are rescued by a group of Sci-Fi fans who just happen to be holding a convention in Minneapolis. Just as in our current campaigns against the idea of Global Warming, the politically correct resp [...]

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    21. An amusing, occasionally frustrating, visit to a not-too-distant future in which staunch environmentalists have seized the reins of power -- to an unfortunate extreme. Earth's in the grip of a new ice age, and feeding the planet has become an even more formidable challenge. Vastly complicating matters, progress has been halted and most technology is considered evil. The space program is a particular victim of this mindset, and some of those who'd wish it to be otherwise have escaped into orbit, [...]

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    22. fter a few weeks of on & off reading, I finally finished Fallen Angels by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle & Michael Flynn. Part of the reason it took so long is because I was reading it in e-book format, courtesy of The Baen Free Library.I had just finished reading the part where Alex (one of the astronauts stranded on Earth) visits an abandoned museum and finds a plaque commemorating the Challenger astronauts the day before the Columbia exploded. :^(Larry Niven is currently one of my favor [...]

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    23. The next ice age is developing and our intrepid heroes, most of them science fiction fans if you can believe this, are off to rescue a pair of astronauts who've been shot down for the "crime" of scooping nitrogen from the upper atmosphere.What follows is an unlikely tale (but pretty scientifically accurate) of rescue and the attempts to get the two (and maybe some more) back to their space habitat (an overcrowded, cobbled together, pair of space stations that are just barely surviving, plus a mo [...]

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    24. This is a great book, particularly if you consider yourself a science fiction fan -- science fiction fans are the heroes of the day. This book is another Promethius Award winner, and very deservedly so. I highly recommend it. The book describes a dystopian and anti-technology society set in the not-to-distant future. Civilization as we know it is desperately threatened by a vicious and rapidly progressing new ice age, brought about, ironically, by environmentalists who thought global warming was [...]

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    25. In the near future, the green movement has become very popular in America and science and technology are only tolerated when necessary. Various government agencies 're-educate' technophiles and science fiction is banned. There are a small number of people living in space stations and a gradually decreasing underground movement of sci-fi fans who try to keep knowledge alive.On a mission to harvest vital nitrogen from the Earth's atmosphere, two of the inhabitants of the space stations are shot do [...]

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    26. Not that good. Though the writers are sort of well-known, I expected much more from my first acquaintance with them. Having read the blurb on the cover, I thought this would be an interesting novel and I actually kept thinking that the first few times I picked it up, with characters that had a chance of being interesting and a setting that was at least something different than any sci-fi novel I have read until now. However, the story continued, characters meet other characters, hilarity ensues [...]

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    27. This is one of my favorite books of all time, and made it into a set of 12 books that I brought when I moved to America with just a backpack and a briefcase, and left behind about 100 SF and F books. One of the others was Queen of Angels by Greg Bear.Edit:Stumbled across my oldish review here because of Arkwright and a review posted by someone there called that book a "love letter to science fiction". That's a new one on me but quite appropriate. This is that same genre, as is Heinlein's "have s [...]

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    28. Niven and Pournelle have collaborated on some of the best sci-fi books I've read. This is not one of them.The book seems to be more inside humor about sci-fi fans than a serious attempt at a sci-fi book. Thankfully, I got it from Baen Books as the initial freebie in the Pournelle collection. Very odd selection for the free sample book. Had I not read any other Niven/Pournelle, I would likely avoid them in the future. I don't think that's generally the point of the free sample. I suppose they did [...]

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    29. This is a fun book, with a lot of affection for classic sci-fi fandom. I'm only peripherally a part of that group--I do media fandom, mostly Internet-based, instead of lit sci-fi fandom, with 'zines and cons--but I definitely felt a kinship with these people, and a lot of them I was sure I'd met at one point or another in my life.I also felt like it did a great job of universe-building. I read this over several days on my commute home, and every time I had to drag myself out of the book to get o [...]

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    30. I don't typically read much science fiction, but my husband introduced me to this book. I found it interesting. The plot moves rapidly. There are lots of characters, but the writer was fairly tidy in managing them. This book was written in the 1980s, and I found it interesting to look back at that era from a scientific angle. About viewpoints--I noticed that the point of view frequently shifts from one character to another, even within the same chapter. Not used to that, but I managed to adapt. [...]

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